Tag Archives: auction

Cartier Pasha Minute Repeater Men’s Watch Climbs to CA$64,900 in Miller & Miller’s Online Watches & Jewels Sale, Nov. 20

New Hamburg, Ontario, Canada, December 4, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A Cartier Pasha minute repeater men’s watch slipped onto a new wrist for $64,900 in Miller & Miller Auctions’ bi-annual Watches & Jewels sale held November 20th. Offered were luxury watches and fine jewelry, with rare, desirable vintage and collectible watches from names like Rolex, Tudor, Omega, Patek Philippe, Corum and Panerai.

The Cartier Pasha watch (Ref. W30012) was easily the top achiever in an auction that grossed $512,179 (all prices quoted are in Canadian dollars). It featured the calibre 179 18 kt gold movement with 26 jewels designed by Gerald Genta. The minute repeater, perpetual calendar with day-date-month, moon phase and leap year indicator all worked in perfect harmony.

Right behind the Pasha was another Cartier beauty: a Diabolo Tourbillon wristwatch, a rarity produced in limited numbers through the mid-to-late-1990’s that’s only been going up in value as watch collectors scramble to add unique pieces to their collections. This example was serviced and refinished by Cartier in Switzerland in Dec. 2018. It sold for $29,500.

In all, 215 lots came up for bid. They included wristwatches, pocket watches, rings, necklaces, bracelets, earrings and pins. Following are additional highlights from the auction, in which 267 registered bidders placed 5,576 total bids. All prices include an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

The auction’s runner-up top lot was a stunning platinum 15.45 carat diamond cocktail ring with a claw-set marquise-shaped cut diamond, fancy yellowish brown, weighing 4.32 carats, VS-1 clarity, plus 32 claw-set round brilliant cut diamonds having an approximate total weight of 5.93 carats. The size 8 ring, weighing 30.80 grams total, brought $29,500.

Staying with jewelry, a 14kt gold lady’s combination cast and assembled four-prong solitaire ring with a bright polish finish and one basket-set round brilliant cut diamond weighing 2.82 carats (Color: E, Clarity: SI-2) went for $15,340; and an 18kt white gold lady’s hand-assembled, custom-made diamond engagement ring with a nice high polish finish, containing one claw-set, pear-shaped cut diamond weighing 3.42 carats (Color: M, Clarity: SI-2), topped out at $12,980.

A pair of 14kt yellow gold estate diamond stud earrings, each with one claw-set round brilliant cut diamond weighing 1.38 carats (Color: M, Clarity: SI-1), with an appraisal report from Gem Lab, rose to $10,620. Returning to watches, a circa 2000 lady’s Jaeger-Lecoultre Reverso Swiss watch (Ref. 265.3.86) realized $11,800. The front of the case boasted a tasteful array of diamonds and emeralds; the back was surrounded with a frame of diamonds and emeralds.

A circa 1978 Rolex Explorer II “Steve McQueen” watch (Ref. 1655), nicknamed “Freccioni” (Italian for “big arrow”, which describes the watch’s large hand) went out the door for $23,600.

A circa 1966 Rolex Ref. 16613 Submariner Date watch, stainless steel with 18kt center links and bezel, plus a tritium dial, sold within estimate for $12,980. Also, a circa 1991 Rolex Ref. 16570 Explorer II, an intrepid chronometer built to accompany explorers in extreme challenges, earned $11,800. A distinctive red hand displayed the time in 24-hour format, to distinguish between night and day, a handy feature for worldly adventurers.

A rare Tudor (Ref. 7928/0) Oyster-Prince Submariner watch, produced only in 1967, with an open minute track that extends to the outer flange of the dial, tritium hands and number plots that have turned to an appealing mustard bronze, reached $10,620; while a circa 1978 Tudor Ref. 94110 Submariner watch with stainless case and rolled link oyster band, and a bi-directional rotating bezel and unusual “snowflake” hands, fetched $10,620.

A circa 2013 Cartier Tank Américaine lady’s watch with an elongated, 27mm, 18kt white gold case curvier than the original model, to which diamonds were added to create a more impressive presence, rang up $10,620. Also, a Cartier 750kt rose and white gold lady’s hand-assembled bangle bracelet with a fold-over clasp and bright polish finish, modified to include cross-intersecting bands of diamonds set in white gold, hammered for $10,030.

This was an online-only auction, with no in-person event to attend, but bidders were able to tune in to the live webcast on auction day at www.MillerandMillerAuctions.com, to watch the lots close in real time. Internet bidding was provided by the Miller & Miller website, as well as the popular platform www.LiveAuctioneers.com. Telephone and absentee bids were also accepted.

Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. has three more online-only auctions lined up for the winter and early spring. The first one is coming up quick: a Petroliana, Breweriana & Advertising auction scheduled for Saturday, December 4th. It will be followed by a Canadiana & Folk Art auction, featuring Part 2 of the Osler collection, on February 12th; and then a Music Machines, Toys & Advertising auction in March 2022 (date and time to be announced; watch website for details).

To learn more about Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. and firm’s calendar of upcoming events, visit www.millerandmillerauctions.com.

About Miller & Miller Auctions. Ltd.:
Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. is Canada’s trusted seller of high-value collections and is always accepting quality consignments. The firm specializes in watches and jewelry, art, antiques and high-value collectibles. Its mission is to provide collectors with a trusted place to buy and sell. To consign a single piece, an estate or a collection, you may call them at (519) 573-3710; or, you can e-mail them at info@millerandmillerauctions.com. To learn more about Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd., please visit www.millerandmillerauctions.com. Updates are posted frequently.

World Record Sale from PAI Totals Over $2.6 Million as Rare Posters Auction LXXXV on Nov. 14 Realizes Multiple Top Sales

New York, NY, USA, November 25, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Poster Auctions International’s (PAI) third sale of the year, on November 14, finished at $2,638,320. Rare Posters Auction LXXXV was a world record auction with many lots surpassing their previously realized prices.

Jack Rennert, President of PAI, said, “If there was any doubt about the poster’s vitality, this auction surely proved its lasting—and increasing—cultural and artistic value. Despite the economic impacts of the last two years, our sales continue to increase at an amazing pace. Collectors bid passionately, allowing us to break a number of world records for important artists including Alphonse Mucha, Leonetto Cappiello, and Walter Schnackenberg. Of course, much of this sale’s success can be attributed to the strength and rarity of the consignments we received.”

As with previous auctions this year, Alphonse Mucha continued to be the star of the show. Works by the Belle Époque master of beauty soared to new heights this auction, and his record-shattering sales include: the 1911 Moravian Teachers’ Choir (Pevecké Sdruzení Ucitelu Moravskych), which was won for $43,200 against an estimate of $7,000-$9,000; the 1898 Reverie, printed on silk, sold for $48,000 (est. $20,000-$25,000); his 1901 decorative panels, Ivy & Laurel, earned a winning bid of $43,200 (est. $17,000-$20,000); the 1897 Nestle’s Food for Infants sold for $43,200 (est. $10,000-$12,000); the 1895 Amants was claimed for $48,000 (est. $20,000-$25,000); his 1896 La Dame aux Camelias earned a win of $50,400 (est. $17,000-$20,000); the rare, hand-signed proof of his 1896 Salon des Cent / XXme Exposition garnered $43,200 (est. $30,000-$40,000).

All prices quoted include the buyer’s premium.

The great Montmartre mythologizer, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, saw continued interest in his work. The top sale from this auction was his 1899 Jane Avril, which was won for $108,000. The 1899 Confetti sold for $43,200; his 1893 Aristide Bruant Dans Son Cabaret went for $50,400; the 1894 La Loge au Mascaron Doré sold for $45,600.

Further Art Nouveau works also spurred tremendous interest. A never-before-seen design by Pal, The Lions / Nouveau Cirque, from ca. 1894, inspired a sale of $7,800 (est. $2,500-$3,000). F. Hugo d’Alesi’s 1894 maquette for Centenaire de la Lithographie / Galerie Rapp was won for $43,200 (est. $30,000-$40,000). Adolfo Hohenstein’s exquisite 1898 A. Calderoni was secured for a bid of $7,800 (est. $3,000-$4,000). Privat Livemont’s iconic 1896 Absinthe Robette continues to reach new sales heights; this time, it was won for $22,800 (est. $10,000-$12,000). Louis J. Rhead’s ca. 1896 Bechstein was highly desired, leading to a winning bid of $12,000 (est. $4,000-$5,000). Manuel Orazi’s elegant Maison Moderne, from 1900, sold for $72,000. Two iconic works from Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen inspired passionate bids: his 1905 Clinique Chéron was won for $31,200 (est. $17,000-$20,000), and his 1894 Lait pur Stérilisé sold for $22,800 (est. $14,000-$17,000). And this auction’s catalogue cover, Walter Schnackenberg’s 1912 Odeon Casino—the best printing seen yet—sold for the highest amount to date: $50,400 (est. $25,000-$30,000).

Celestial bicycle posters captivated collectors at auction. The anonymous ca. 1895 Cycles Gladiator soared off into the cosmos for $45,600 (est. $30,000-$40,000). H. Gray’s 1899 Cycles Sirius was claimed for $9,600 (est. $4,000-$5,000), and Pal’s 1895 Fernand Clément & Cie. touched the stars with a winning bid of $12,000 (est. $5,000-$6,000)—both record sales.

Further designs for transit scored exceptionally high bids. Roger Perot’s 1933 Grand Prix de Nice sold for $8,400 (est. $5,000-$6,000); Plinio Codognato’s forceful 1923 Gran Premio d’Europa / Fiat earned a winning bid of $90,000 (est. $70,000-$90,000). Collectors also vied for Leslie Ragan’s 1941 New York Central / Empire State Express, which surpassed its estimate of $4,000-$5,000 for a final sale of $11,400.

For Leonetto Cappiello, known as the father of modern advertising, sales were also fruitful. A 1911 maquette, Carnaval / Vinho do Porto, sold for $33,600. His 1926 Automoto / Byrrh made its auction debut, and collectors clamored for the rare design; it was won for $10,200 (est. $7,000-$9,000). His striking 1931 Kub sold for $60,000, and the 1933 Le Petit Dauphinois inspired a winning bid of $38,400.

As for Art Deco works, several notable designs were auctioned. Burkhard Mangold’s 1914 Winter in Davos—which has not been at auction in 14 years—exceeded its estimate of $12,000-$15,000 for a win of $20,400. Gert Sellheim’s 1936 Australia / Surf Club sold for $9,600 (est. $7,000-$9,000). Martin Peikert’s 1945 ski poster, Wengen-Männlichen, quickly surpassed its estimate of $1,400-$1,700 for a win of $7,200. Otto Baumberger’s handsome 1923 PKZ sold for $5,280 (est. $2,500-$3,000). A. M. Cassandre’s 1928 Londen was won for $15,600 (est. $8,000-$10,000), and his 1931 L’Atlantique went for $24,000. A 1932 maquette by Paul Colin, Ces Messieurs Dames, secured a winning bid of $14,400 (est. $10,000-$12,000). Works by Luciano Achille Mauzan also performed well: his 1930 Bertozzi sold for $6,000 (est. $3,000-$4,000); his 1921 Gallia / Oeufs Séchés went for $3,360; his 1929 Crosley was won for $7,800.

Poster Auctions International’s next Rare Posters Auction will be held in New York on Sunday, March 6, 2022. Consignments are accepted until December 10. To learn more about PAI, visit www.posterauctions.com.

About Poster Auctions International:
Poster Auctions International is located at 26 W. 17th Street, New York, NY 10011. PAI may be reached by phone at 212-787-4000, or via email at info@posterauctions.com. To learn more about PAI, visit www.posterauctions.com.

White Star Line Button from One of Two Barbers on The Titanic (and a survivor) will be Auctioned Dec. 18 by Mohawk Arms

Bouckville, NY, USA, November 10, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A White Star Line button worn by one of two barbers on board the Titanic (who survived the disaster), plus a trove of items pertaining to the renowned American naval officer, aviator and polar explorer Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd are expected highlights in Mohawk Arms’ Militaria Auction #86, an Internet and gallery auction slated for December 18th.

Auction #86 is brimming with hundreds of items spanning multiple conflicts and generations, online and live in the gallery on Route 20 in Bouckville, in upstate New York. The full catalog will be up soon, at www.MilitaryRelics.com, plus LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. New items continue to pour in, like an American colonial Rev War-era cannon, circa 1740-1780.

Charles Weikman was a chief barber on the ill-fated Titanic the night it struck an iceberg and sank in the icy waters of the North Atlantic Ocean the night of April 15, 1912. He stood on the deck of the ship as it sank, awaiting his fate, when suddenly the stern of the ship rose out of the water to a perpendicular position, tossing him and hundreds of others in to the chilly waters.

Weikman was able to grab onto some floating debris and went unconscious. When he came to, he was in a lifeboat, one of the lucky ones who survived. He was still wearing his barber coat, with the White Star Line button (which has been authenticated as period correct to 1910-1912). He gifted the button to his daughter, who later gave it to one of her teachers, a button collector.

The teacher subsequently sold her collection, along with the button, to another collector, in Pennsylvania. Her son, who inherited the collection, is the consignor. An aside: Mr. Weikman later served as a barber on the Lusitania. He resigned, however, in early 1915, after German submarines began to target ships in the Atlantic Ocean. In doing so, he avoided a second disaster.

The button is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the consignor. He writes, “My mother, Sara, was a button collector and received the button from her friend, Miss Helen Martin, who was also a button collector for many years. This button is from Charles Weikman’s coat. Charles was…..one of the two barbers on the Titanic…… Miss Martin was given the button by Charles Weikman’s daughter, Helen, a student of Miss Martin’s at Palmyra High School” (New Jersey).

The letters, photos and ephemera from the personal possessions of Rear Admiral Byrd (1888-1957) are certain to appeal to collectors who recognize the achievements of a true American hero and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Byrd claimed that his expeditions were the first to reach both the North and South Pole by air. He also discovered the dormant Mount Sidley volcano in Antarctica. Included are original reels of films (including one from the North Pole).

Also up for bid is an incredible photo taken in April 1928 for the Boston Traveler newspaper, showing Byrd, holding a package of anti-pneumonia serum, flanked by aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, after the two landed in Quebec, Canada, from New York. Their mission: to save the life of Floyd Bennett, who was suffering from pneumonia. The serum didn’t work; Bennett died.

Speaking of Lindbergh, also in the sale is an FBI poster relating to the 1932 kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby, listing all the serial numbers of the bills. After an intense manhunt, police and the FBI eventually arrested Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German carpenter, and charged him with the abduction and murder of the 20-month-old. Hauptmann later died in the electric chair.

Also in the sale is a lot from the estate of Dr. Frederick White, who worked on The Manhattan Project, which produced the atomic bomb that ended World War II. Included is a government certificate, stating that his work was “essential to the production of the Atomic Bomb…” Also included is a lapel badge (“Inspectors Club, Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant”) and other ephemera.

Imperial German helmets, a staple at most Mohawk Arms auctions, will be led by the helmet of Prinz Alfons of Bavaria as Honorary Regimental Commander of the 5th Prussian Dragoon Regiment (“Freiherr von Manteuffel”), with dress/parade feather bush and four original photos (one autographed), four photo postcards (one autographed) and several other ephemera items.

Other Imperial German helmets will include a Prussian Jager/Schutzen officer dress shako, a Garde Uhlan “tschapka” (felt body), a Baden Artillery officer’s helmet and others. Also sold will be regimental steins (including a rare “Jager Regiment zu Pferde”), medals, swords (Bavarian Court, Kurrasier No.7 officer, etc.), a collection of Wilhelm II family and circa 1900 Fine Arts performers photo postcards, an Imperial Hungarian General’s parade dress tunic and other items.

German Third-Reich items will feature a correspondence file of initialed letters to and from Himmler, with translations (a report on the effect of V-1 rockets on Great Britain, war news, personalities, etc.); daggers (officer RLB and Red Cross, SA, NSKK, etc.), swords, a collection of medals, cuff titles, insignia, peaked caps and helmets (Bahnschutz, Fire Police, Red Cross).

Also up for bid will be European flint and percussion pistols, a U.S. 1820s “bell crown” shako, a Civil War “Tiffany” “wrist-breaker”, leather goods, Civil War excavated shell fragments with maps of locations, WWII items (uniforms, headgear, edged weapons, etc.), a Japanese WWI “Adrian” helmet with Red Cross cover, a kyo-gunto sword, posters and ethnographic weapons.

Mohawk Arms’ next big Internet and catalog auction after this one is planned for the spring of 2022, probably sometime in April. The company typically conducts two large sales annually. To learn more about Mohawk Arms, Inc., and the Internet and gallery auction planned for Saturday, Dec, 18th at 9:45 am EDT, visit www.MilitaryRelics.com.

Stevens Auction Company’s Annual Thanksgiving Antique Auction will be Saturday, Nov. 13th, Online and in Aberdeen, Miss

Aberdeen, MS, USA, November 4, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Eager bidders will be giving thanks at Stevens Auction’s Thanksgiving Antique Auction set for Saturday, November 13th, live in the gallery at 609 North Meridian Street in Aberdeen, and online via LiveAuctioneers.com. Offered will be items from a 9,000-square-foot home in Gulf Port, Miss., plus estates from Eutaw, Ala., and Centerville, Miss.

Expected top lots include a heavily carved oak dining room suite attributed to the renowned 19th century American furnituremaker R. J. Horner, a beautiful palace-size Aubusson rug that cost $40,000 when purchased new, and a magnificent pair of early 19th century Old Paris vases that was museum deaccessioned 50 years ago. The auction will start promptly at 10 am Central time.

The Horner dining room suite is the sale’s headliner, with an estimate of $15,000-$45,000. It consists of a china cabinet, banquet-size table with five leaves, six chairs and a sideboard, all beautifully carved with wing griffins and feet. Also from Horner is an oak china cabinet in the original finish, carved from top to bottom with dragon and fruit carved cresting, large protruding carved lions and fruit, and large protruding carved full body dolphins (estimate: $2,000-$4,000).

The Aubusson rug is truly palace-size, at 14 feet by 30 feet. It’s expected to sell for $10,000-$20,000, half its original sale price. Other fine rugs up for bid will include a beige, green and gold Oushak rug, 18 feet by 12 feet (estimate: $1,800-$3,000); a handmade red, blue and white Persian rug, 9 feet 10 inches by 14 feet 2 inches (estimate: $600-$1,500); and a large, green and rose-colored needlepoint tapestry, 13 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 11 inches (estimate: $600-$1,200).

The pair of two-part, early 20th Old Paris vases boasts intricate detailing, with lattice work from top to bottom and breathtaking painting with the highest gold content for all the gilting. The vases, showing no wear at all, is estimated to bring $5,000-$15,000. Also offered will be a large and impressive pair of two-part, 19th century Royal Vienna urns with fine figural paintings, ornate raised decorations and intense gold gilt, both 23 inches tall (estimate: $3,000-$5,000).

Tables worth considering include a unique rosewood Aesthetic Movement pedestal table with winged griffins and inlay burl trim (estimate: $4,000-$10,000); and a very large rosewood Victorian center table attributed to Charles Boudoine, 46 inches wide (estimate: $2,000-$4,000).

Beds will feature a spectacular contemporary mahogany half tester bed with drapes and carved crown (estimate: $5,000-$7,500); a six-piece Lillian Russell cherry bedroom suite, signed Davis Cabinet Company, with twin beds, a chest, a dresser, a night stand and shaving mirror (estimate: $2,500-$5,000); and a rosewood grained full size tester bed from Shamrock Plantation, attributed to Mitchell & Rammelsberg (a maker featured often in Stevens sales) (estimate: $2,000-$4,000).

A handsome rosewood rococo secretary that’s been in the same place for 75 years, originally from the Shamrock Plantation, 98 inches tall by 47 inches wide, is expected to ring up $2,500-$4,000. Also, an equally attractive olive wood period 1780 secretary with a fitted interior in the upper section, 7 feet 10 inches tall by 42 inches wide, has a pre-sale estimate of $3,000-$4,000.

Pedestals will include a marble-top mahogany figural pedestal, 43 inches tall (estimate: $3,000-$6,000); a solid mahogany round pedestal with wing griffin top, 42 inches tall (estimate: $1,500-$3,000); and a walnut pedestal with three puttis, claw feet and grapes (estimate: $2,000-$3,500).

The lamps and lighting category will feature a Victorian brass and alabaster banquet lamp with a hand-painted shade, possibly of Rembrandt (estimate: $1,000-$3,000); a brass Victorian lamp by Bradley and Hubbard, still oil with dragons, a red globe and double burner (estimate: $1,000-$3,000); and a Victorian hanging light with owls on shade and font (estimate: $1,000-$2,500).

Grandfather clocks will come up for bid, including a Tiffany 9-tube grandfather clock in great condition, in a classical mahogany case with columns, 93 inches tall (estimate: $3,000-$6,000); and a mahogany Empire case 9-tube grandfather clock, 90 inches tall (estimate: $1,500-$2,500).

In the hunt for a banquet or dining table? This sale will feature an antique English manor banquet dining table with original brass feet and rollers, 11 feet 6 inches long (estimate: $3,000-$6,000); a fine 19th century Federal banquet table with ornate signed bronze feet and six leaves, in the original crate, 12 feet long (estimate: $3,000-$5,000); and solid cherry Federal banquet table ends with carved and turned legs, in great condition, 76 inches long (estimate: $1,200-$2,000).

A magnificent pair of 18th or 19th century carved doors, measuring 89 ½ inches tall by 58 inches wide, carries an estimate of $3,000-$6,000); while an incredible 19th century rococo walnut large five-section screen, all pierce-carved with grapes and vines and previously in the home of an heiress, 6 feet 5 inches tall by 8 feet 1 inch wide, is expected to change hands for $3,000-$4,000.

Items for the garden will include an antique marble and bronze fountain in three parts, with a carved double dolphin base, large scalloped shell form basin in marble, topped with a patinated bronze boy with grapes fountainhead, overall 44 inches tall (estimate: $3,000-$5,000); two heavy cast iron white garden benches in a leaf and vine pattern, being sold as two lots (each estimate: $1,000-$2,000; and a pair of cast iron figural planters, 38 inches tall (estimate: $600-$1,200).

Need something to house (or lift) your spirits? An important silver and cut glass 12-inch-tall wine vessel in the original silk-lined case, with insignias by Appointment to King, Elkington and Company, with hallmarks, should finish at $2,500-$5,000; while a Napoleon III Boulle inlaid 20-piece set of gold gilt decanters and wines, probably Baccarat, should hammer for $1,000-$1,500.

Decorative accessories will feature a three-piece Old Paris garniture set, pink with gold and painted flowers (and a crack in the center bowl) (estimate: $1,000-$3,000); a very rare, quality square Victorian American chess table with a beveled glass top and all chess pieces (estimate: $1,000-$3,000); and a bronze of a dog and rabbit, 19 inches long (estimate: $1,000-$2,500).

An open house preview will be held at the gallery on Friday, November 12th, from 10 am-7 pm.

Doors will open at 8 am on auction day, Nov. 13th. Pictures are continually being added to the Stevens website (www.stevensauction.com), so interested parties are encouraged to check often for new additions and further information. For information not contained in the sales brochure, please call 662-369-2200 or email to stevensauction@bellsouth.net. Phone bids are welcome.

Terms of payment are all major credit cards or pre-approved business or personal checks (with proper ID), or wire transfer. A 15 percent buyer’s premium will be applied to all purchases, with an extra 3 percent processing fee for credit cards. A sales tax will be charged as well, except for those bidders with a valid state resale number. Light refreshments will be served on auction day.

To learn more about Stevens Auction Company and the annual Thanksgiving Antique Auction planned for Saturday, Nov. 13, visit www.stevensauction.com.

About Stevens Auction Company:
Stevens Auction Company is always accepting quality consignments for future sales. To consign a single item, an estate or a collection, you may call them directly, at (662) 369-2200; or, you can e-mail them at stevensauction@bellsouth.net. To learn more about Stevens Auction Company, visit www.stevensauction.com. Updates are posted often.

Shannon’s Fall Fine Art Auction, Oct. 28, Posts Strong Prices, Record Results, A $3.6 Million Gross

Milford, CT, USA, November 5, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Lively bidding over the phone and online drove the results at Shannon’s online-only Fall Fine Art Auction held October 28th. Nearly 80 percent of the 177 lots offered were sold, realizing $3.6 million in total sales. All prices reported include the buyer’s premium.

The top lot in the auction was the cover lot, a large watercolor on two sheets of paper by Charles Burchfield, titled January Sun. The painting flew past the estimate before the bidding slowed, selling for $375,000 over the phone. A second Burchfield work, Lincoln Avenue at Main Street, Salem, Ohio, sold for $100,000. From the same collection, a Thomas Hart Benton oil Study for Sugar Cane sold for $275,000 to a Midwestern institution.

Modernist works in the sale were led by a Roberto Matta Untitled painting from 1965. This large-format, surrealist composition measured 80 inches by 150 inches and sold for $200,000 to a museum collection. A Henry Moore drawing titled Rocking Chairs climbed to $162,500; a Marc Chagall watercolor, The Parasol, brought $37,500; Clyde Singer’s Hotel Back Door went for $35,000; and a colorful Paul Jenkins watercolor hit $21,250. Shannon’s set a world record price for Lennart Anderson at $20,000 for a painterly oil, Still Life with Jelly Donuts and Knife.

Three new world records were set for female artists led by a Fidelia Bridges portfolio that sold for $181,250 to a museum collection. A painting by Susan Watkins, a student of Chase, titled Woman Playing a Guitar (1901), sold for $106,250, also to a museum, and Felicie Waldo Howell’s view of Main Street, Gloucester from 1918 gaveled for $57,500.

Leading the results for early 20th century American art, Walter Launt Palmer’s Morning Brook sold for $137,500. A snowy View of Broad Street, New York rose to $125,000, and a new world record was set for Harry Aiken Vincent, whose view of Rockport Harbor sold for $52,500.

Buyers chased quality in the 19th century American art and Hudson River School offerings.

Jasper Francis Cropsey’s Luminist view On the Susquehanna River sold for $112,500; a large Worthington Whittredge, A Primitive Forest Brook, fetched $81,250; a view of Niagara Falls by Hermann Herzog earned $50,000; and a George Inness work titled Light Triumphant sold for $50,000. European paintings were led by Eugene Von Blass’ romantic portrait of Musette that finished at $125,000.

Shannon’s Managing Partner, Sandra Germain, commented, “This was the best sale we have had in ten years. The quality of our offerings was exceptional for the auction. We have found that our buyers, both existing and new, were excited to work with us before the sale, whether in person or through our many virtual previews. I am very pleased with the results and look forward to our continued success in the American art market.”

To learn more, visit www.shannons.com.

Works in Marble Lead The Way in Andrew Jones Auctions’ Sale of Part 1 of The John Nelson Collection Held on October 24th

Downtown Los Angeles, CA, USA, October 26, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Works in marble achieved marvelous results in Andrew Jones Auctions’ October 24th auction of The John Nelson Collection, Part I, which more than doubled its presale estimate to realize $1.6 million. Leading the sale were two magnificent life-size Italian Carrara marble models of dogs, both from the19th century, that brought $62,500.

All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of the buyer’s premium.

An Italian marble torso of a youth, circa 18th/19th century, achieved $35,000, while a pair of Roman marble lion head reliefs made $23,750 against an estimate of $2,000-3,000. Asian items featured a beautiful set of four Chinese hand painted wallpaper panels of birds amidst flowering branches ($12,500); and a Southeast Asian verdigris mixed alloy bust of the Buddha ($15,000).

“I am beyond elated that the sale performed as fantastically as it did,” said Andrew Jones, the president and CEO of Andrew Jones Auctions. “A telephone bidder during the auction said, ‘I bet John is looking down from heaven with a big smile.’ I can’t image a better result than that.”

The future series of sales for The John Nelson collection will be a celebration of the unerring eye of a more than 50-year Los Angeles design and antiques institution – and the man behind John Nelson Antiques. The collection features Chinese porcelain, paintings, French decorative arts, sculpture, antiquities, Grand Tour objects, European furniture, mirrors, chandeliers and more.

The Part 1 auction came just two weeks after another ‘White Glove’ online-only event: the sale of the collection of Lady Victoria White, held Oct. 10. Leading the list of top lots was a pair of oil on canvas paintings by British equestrian artist Sir Alfred James Munnings (1878-1959), titled The Kilkenny Horse Fair ($500,000) and Making a Polo Ground at Princemere ($162,500).

John Nelson had a deep love of European furniture and decorative arts. Testaments to the man’s discerning eye was a pair of Florentine Neoclassical parcel gilt and white painted console tables, circa 1800 ($30,000); and a fine pair of Louis XVI style scarlet lacquered side cabinets by Jean Louis Benjamin Gros (Paris), from the third quarter of the 19th century. The pair made $27,500.

John’s affinity for exquisite chandeliers and mirrors spurred bidders on, as a pair of French Neoclassical style gilt bronze and cut glass 18-light chandeliers in the manner of Maison Baguès, 20th century, fetched $20,000; while a pair of Italian Rococo giltwood and cobalt glass pier mirrors dating from the mid-18th century drove international bidding to a final price of $27,500.

The selection of European paintings was highlighted by a series of four oils on canvas portraits of dogs after Joseph Urbain Melin (French 1811-1886), which collectively achieved $57,500. A wonderful and vibrant oil on canvas of parrots amidst flowers by a follower of Jacob Bogdani (Dutch/Hungarian, 1660-1724) far surpassed its estimate of $3,000-5,000 to gavel for $21,250.

Andrew Jones Auctions’ next big event will be an At Home auction, on Wednesday, November 17th. The sale will consist of nearly 700 lots of antiques, design, fine art accessories and more, including a Philip and Kelvin Laverne bronze Chan coffee table and a large-scale William T. Wiley mixed media work on paper. Part II of the John Nelson Collection will be held Dec. 12.

To learn more about Andrew Jones Auctions and the At Home auction, as well as Part II of the John Nelson Collection, slated for 17 November and 12 December, respectively, please visit www.andrewjonesauctions.com. Updates are posted frequently. Andrew Jones Auctions can be reached by telephone at (213) 748-8008, or via email at info@andrewjonesauctions.com.

First Folio “Fragment” of William Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Published in 1623, will Hit The Auction Block October 29th

Reno, NV, USA, October 22, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- An exceedingly rare First Folio single play “fragment” of William Shakespeare’s The First Part of Henry the Fourth, published in 1623, will be offered during Holabird Western Americana Collections’ Autumn Splendor Western Americana Auction, slated for October 28th-November 1st. The First Folio play will be offered on Day 2 – Friday, Oct. 29th – live and online.

The auction is being held in the Holabird gallery located at 3555 Airway Drive in Reno. Online bidding will be via iCollector.com, LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com.

The full catalog can be viewed online now, at www.holabirdamericana.com. For those planning to attend the auction in person, regulations and protocols regarding COVID-19 will be enforced.

The First Folio of Shakespeare’s plays has been widely referred to by historians, collectors and scholars as the most important literary work in the English language. It is considered by most of academia to be one of the most important books ever published. It’s impossible to tell what the fragment will ultimately sell for, but Holabird has assigned it an estimate of $50,000-$100,000.

“The possibility of owning a piece of the most important literary work extant is a once-in-a lifetime opportunity,” said Fred Holabird, the president and owner of Holabird Western Americana Collections. “We’re proud to present this original copy of a First Folio fragment of Shakespeare’s The First Part of Henry the Fourth. Its new owner will possess literary history.”

The work’s full official title is The First Part of Henry the Fourth, with the Life and Death of HENRY Sirnamed HOT-SPVRRE. The fragment represents one complete play (in a two-part production of Henry IV) that was published in 1623 in England, in the First Folio of William Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories & Tragedies, Published according to True, Original Copies.

The First Folio was reportedly compiled and edited by two of Shakespeare’s actors and friends, John Heminges and Henry Condell. It was printed in London by Isaac Jaggard and Edward Blount. The fragment has been rebound in bright red patent leather and consists of 13 pages printed on antique Renaissance rag paper, originally numbered 46,49-62,65-73 in the First Folio.

As an original fragment of Shakespeare’s First Folio, these bound pages are, by very definition, unique. Nowhere else exists a copy of Shakespeare’s original, very first, professionally published copy of The First Part of Henry the Fourth that is identical to this one – from the provenance to the unique watermark design to the old Renaissance rag paper and gold-trimmed red binding.

In September of this year, Dr. Eric Rasmussen, the University of Nevada / Reno Professor and Department Chair of English and Philosophy, a world-renowned Shakespearean scholar and one of the leading experts on Shakespeare’s First Folios, examined the fragment and authenticated it as an original 1623 fragment of Shakespeare’s First Folio. He added its value was “inestimable.”

Inside the front cover of the fragment, a custom book plate is affixed with the name Otto Orren Fisher, a nationally renowned collector of rare books and manuscripts. An industrial surgeon, Dr. Fisher began his hobby of collecting with the goal of owning one rare item in his lifetime. Upon his death in 1961, he owned more than 80,000 rare books that occupied three floors of his home.

Included in his collection were four complete Shakespeare Folios—described as “the first printed collections of English literature’s greatest writer and among the rarest volumes in the world.” In 1949 Dr. Fisher donated all four complete Shakespeare Folios to Miami University, where they are still housed today in the King Library. Extraneous folio fragments remained in his collection.

Rare books containing the Otto Orren Fisher nameplate have surfaced all over the world, many donated to academic institutions’ libraries’ special collections departments, and others appearing in rare book auctions. There are very few sales of First Folio fragments published online, and none are comparable to this one, relative to page count, completeness, binding, and condition.

As Henry IV was one of the most popular of Shakespeare’s plays at the time, copies of this play were highly prized and treasured, and therefore may have had a higher likelihood of surviving three to four centuries. It is possible Dr. Fisher acquired many different fragments of original Folios over the years as he was amassing his rare book collection. But that is pure conjecture.

It is safe to assume, though, given the time period of the binding and the name plate present, that Dr. Fisher had this fragment bound by the London firm Sangorski & Sutcliffe. It’s important to note here that one page is missing from this fragment: it’s printed on both sides and is numbered pages 63/64. Missing pages are rather common for authentic First Folio copies and fragments.

It’s likely the page was known to be absent at the time of binding. Often pages are lost to antiquity and authentic replacements can’t be acquired. According to Dr. Rasmussen, it is not uncommon for fragments and “complete” folios to be bound with many pages missing, as the rarity of original 1623 copies make compiling a truly complete copy of a single play a huge task.

The subject of missing pages has been a topic of much debate; specifically, of how many missing pages is acceptable before a 900-page First Folio no longer qualifies as “complete”. Put in the context of 400-year-old literature, and “complete” copies missing as many as 30-40% of the original pages, only one missing page out of 14 does not significantly affect the condition rating.

Overall, this First Folio fragment is in very fine condition. There are some small chips and tears on the edges of some of the inside thinner paper pages, and the paper is discolored in varying degrees from page to page, commensurate with the fragment’s age – 400 years old. During Dr. Rasmussen’s inspection, nothing concerning about the condition of this fragment was noted.

For more information, visit www.holabirdamericana.com.

About Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC:
Holabird Western Americana Collections is always in the hunt for new and major collections to bring to market. It prides itself as being a major source for selling Americana at the best prices obtainable, having sold more than any other similar company in the past decade alone. The firm will have its entire sales database online soon, at no cost – nearly 200,000 lots sold since 2014. To consign a single piece or a collection, you may call Fred Holabird at 775-851-1859 or 844-492-2766; or, you can send an e-mail to fredholabird@gmail.com. To learn more about Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC, please visit www.holabirdamericana.com. Updates posted often.

The Historic Antebellum Adams French Mansion in Aberdeen, Mississippi is for Sale. The Price is $750,000 (or Best Offer)

Aberdeen, MS, USA, October 23, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- The historic Adams French mansion – a magnificent, 7,000-square-foot antebellum home on the National Register of Historic Places, situated on four bucolic acres atop the highest elevated point in Aberdeen – is for sale, for $750,000 (or best offer). The buyer would also have the option of purchasing the home’s top-quality furnishings from the period.

The seller is the mansion’s sole occupant – Dwight Stevens, the owner of Stevens Auction Company, based in Aberdeen. After acquiring the house in 2002, and until 2006, when a fire to the roof forced a two-year renovation, Mr. Stevens regularly conducted his auctions there. “The mansion was the site of many million-dollar auctions,” he said. “I have some great memories.”

The mansion was built starting in 1856 by Col. John Cox, a wealthy plantation owner who was also in the lumber business. Many plantation owners at the time built opulent homes like Adams French for their wives. In Col. Cox’s case, he built the home for his only daughter, Mary Jane. It took less than two years to complete, thanks to Mr. Cox’s sawmill, which supplied the lumber.

In 1857, Mary Jane married Robert Adams, a local banker, and the two moved into the Greek Revival home upon its completion. It was considered an architectural wonder for its time, with a prime location located just three blocks from Aberdeen’s Main Street. The four acres of grounds were beautifully landscaped then, as they are today, with formal gardens, fountains and statuary.

The purchase price includes a former church, first built in 1905 about four miles away by freed slaves who called it the James Creek Missionary Baptist Church. When Mr. Stevens learned that a group was looking to tear the church down, in 2005, he offered to move the structure instead to his mansion grounds. The move was documented on an episode of the Home & Garden channel.

The mansion features five bedrooms, five bathrooms, a modern updated kitchen and a formal parlor that opens into a formal dining room. The basement has been made into a full gym, while the third floor boasts a home theater, giant closets, a spare bedroom and a bathroom. An elevator travels from the basement to the second floor, a feature the Coxes couldn’t imagine in the 1850s.

In 1872, Robert Adams passed away, and Mary Jane eventually re-married, to a local physician whose last name was French (hence the name the Adams French mansion). Dr. French passed away in 1887 and Mary Jane lived the rest of her life in the mansion, twice-widowed. She never had children. When she died, in 1898, the home went to nieces and nephews, who rented it out.

Sadly, what was once a grand structure, the pride of the town, fell into a period of disrepair and neglect. The Masons purchased it in 1933, only using it sparingly, as they already owned a former opera house in town and held their meetings there. But when that burned down, they turned to the Adams French mansion and used it as a Mason meeting hall, from 1941 to 2002.

In 2002, the Masons decided to sell the building and approached Mr. Stevens to handle the auction of it. He agreed, and it changed his life. “I personally guaranteed a selling price of one hundred thousand dollars,” he recalled, “but when nobody bid that, I said, ‘Well, it looks like I just bought myself a mansion.’” From 2002-2006 he held auctions there, but lived elsewhere.

When the fire in June 2006 caused some damage to the home, Mr. Stevens was faced with a choice: roll up his sleeves and renovate and restore it, or let it go to the wrecking ball. “I decided to save it,” he said. “It was actually a fairly easy decision, since I was already involved in the restoration of several other historic buildings in Aberdeen. It was just another major project.”

In 2008, Mr. Stevens moved into the mansion, this time as its sole resident (his auction business was, and still is, thriving, at 609 North Meridian Street). New appointments included a Cornelius gasolier (cost: $40,000), expensive draperies, $25,000 plantation shutters, a Prudent Mallard bed, Mitchell & Rammelsberg bedroom suites and an Empire dining room table that’s 15 ½ feet long.

The house has the original mantel, heavy crown molding and a spiral staircase that spirals from the 1st to the 2nd floor and then again from the 2nd to the 3rd floor. All the rooms are tastefully done, with period accessories. The windows have heavy custom drapes and all the rooms have period 19th century chandeliers and gasoliers (which would be included in the purchase price).

Over the last ten years, many modern updates have been made to the mansion, to including new electric, plumbing, storm windows, insulation, three units of central heating and air and hot water on demand on the third floor. The home is comfortable twelve months of the year, with very reasonable utility bills. “Upkeep is no more than any home of its size,” Mr. Stevens remarked.

Interestingly, the Adams French mansion is only standing today because, during the Civil War, the Union General William T. Sherman got sidetracked on his scorched-earth march through Mississippi, leaving Aberdeen and several other Mississippi towns intact. It was a fortunate twist of fate, as lovely antebellum structures like Adams French are a large slice of American history.

Anyone interested in buying the Adams French mansion may call Dick Leike of Crye-Leike Realtors, at (901) 486-2070. “I have over one million dollars invested in Adams French and its grounds,” Stevens said. “I hope to find a buyer who will take over the mansion and church and live there or share with the community by opening it to pilgrimage and community events.”

Visitors to the Stevens Auction Company website – www.stevensauction.com – can learn more about the Adams French mansion by clicking “Real Estate” on the toolbar. They can also watch a YouTube video on the home, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlXjZzQcPPE&t=47s.

About Stevens Auction Company:
Stevens Auction Company conducts one-of-a-kind auctions, comprised of only hand-picked estates and antiques, chosen specifically for their provenance and excellence. The company holds estate auctions numerous times a year on location at some of the most prominent old homes in the South. As a result, Stevens now sells choice real estate as well some of the finest antiques found on today’s market. Auctions are held year round on-site or in Aberdeen, Mississippi, even in less-than-fair weather under huge tents. The gallery is near the heart of Historic Downtown Aberdeen, only blocks from Main Street. The building has over 12,000 square feet, and it has been renovated and outfitted specifically to house his company’s one-of-a-kind antique auctions. To learn more, please visit www.stevensauction.com.

Sublime Painting by American Landscape Artist John F. Kensett (1816-1872) Soars to $1.08 Million at Cottone Auctions

Geneseo, NY, USA, October 6, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A truly sublime painting titled Singing Beach & Eagle Rock, Magnolia, Massachusetts by American landscape artist John Frederick Kensett (1816-1872), was the top lot in Cottone Auctions’ Fine Art, Antiques and Clock auction held on Saturday, September 18th. The painting saw trade competition into the high six figures, and easily surpassed its estimate, selling to a private collector by phone for $1.08 million. Overall, the sale grossed $3.7 million.

The Kensett painting was purchased in 1955 by Mrs. Adrian Smith (formerly Lusyd Wright Keating) of Buffalo, New York, from Victor D. Spark of New York, and bequested to her daughter Cynthia Doolittle in 1971. It was previously twice exhibited at the Albright Knox Art Gallery, first in 1958 and again in 1983.

“It has been a privilege to market the painting,” said Matt Cottone of Cottone Auctions. “I was pleased for our consignor – the Doolittles – who could have sent their things anywhere but gave us the opportunity.”

Catalog notes included quotes regarding the painting, including a letter by John K. Howat, assistant curator of American paintings and sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Mrs. Adrian W. Smith, on May 25, 1965, stating, “The Kensett strikes me as being a very fine one. The arrangement and colors are very clear and forceful — a good sign in Kensett’s work. The silence of these spare Kensetts is very impressive.”

More recently, Susan Crane, associate curator Albright Knox Art Gallery, in a letter to Mr. & Mrs. Doolittle on March 24, 1983, said, “Your Kensett was an important element in the success of the show — it really made the room glow. Several art historians, in fact, commented on its excellence. It really does rank with the most magnificent of his works, and we are grateful to have been able to show it in the context of his ‘peers’.”

There were also many outstanding lamps in the auction. These were led by a rare Tiffany Studios elaborate Peony lamp on a telescopic library base with a 22-inch shade ($390,000); a fine Tiffany Studios Dragonfly table lamp on a reticulated Indian base with a 20-inch shade ($153,600); a Tiffany Studios, Lily Pad table lamp on a twisted vine base with a 20-inch shade ($127,200); a Tiffany Studios Bamboo table lamp with a 16-inch shade ($136,800); and a rare Duffner and Kimberly Poppy floor lamp on a renaissance floor base ($98,400).

Modern and contemporary art included an oil on canvas designator by Ted Stamm (American, 1944-1984), titled DGR-32 (Dodger), selling for $55,200 to an overseas buyer. A gouache by Patrick Heron sold for $23,400 and Maternite by Vu Cao Dam brought $21,600. An oil on board by British artist Tristram Hillier titled The Mud Berth sold to a U.K buyer for $16,200.

An Early Tibetan Thangka from a private Rochester, New York collection sold to the phones for $30,000. A fine Turkish sword (Kilij) from the historic Wadsworth family sold to a buyer in Istanbul for $24,000, and a rare 17th century scagliola table, also from the Wadsworth family, brought $12,000.

The clocks category featured a rare E. Howard & Co. No. 49 astronomical hanging regulator, purchased directly from Edward Howard in 1875 by Henry Abbott, which sold for $174,000 to a bidder by phone. Other highlights included a rare D. J. Gale astronomical calendar gallery clock, patent model 1871, selling for $43,200, and a Robert Houdin (Paris) mystery swinging clock, which sold for $12,000.

Americana featured two exemplary Navajo weavings, one a Second Phase chief’s blanket, circa 1860-1870, the other a Navajo transitional blanket, in near pristine condition. Both were descended in the family of Othniel Charles Marsh, a paleontologist at Yale University. The blankets were purportedly given to him by Red Cloud, the native American Sioux chief. After intense competition, the blankets totaled $204,000.

Period furniture was led by a fine and rare Chippendale serpentine blocked-end slant-front desk, circa 1770, figured mahogany with a deep rich amber patina, shell carved and blocked interior, block ends and bold ball and claw feet with original period brasses, from the Wadsworth family ($15,000); and a diminutive New England Queen Anne tiger maple highboy, circa 1740-1760, with a deep rich honey brown patina, cabriole legs and pad feet with period brasses, purchased from Israel Sack in the 1940’s ($18,600).

For more information about Cottone Auctions and the firm’s calendar of upcoming auction events, please visit www.cottoneauctions.com; or, call (585) 243-1000.

About Cottone Auctions:
Since 1985, Cottone Auctions has expertly handled a diverse mix of fine art and antiques for national and international audiences. With average sales between $1 million and $2.5 million, our typical offerings include Fine Jewelry, Asian Art, Modern Design, American & European Paintings, Decorative Items, Americana, Native American, Oriental Rugs, and more. Allow Cottone to be your gateway to the international art market through live internet and unlimited phone bidding. Cottone Auctions strives to provide welcoming personal service with outstanding final results. We are proud to work with private individuals, estates, museums, and institutions across the United States and all over the world. If you represent a museum, have a private collection, or are deaccessioning a single time or an estate, contact us today to learn more about how to consign. To learn more, please visit www.cottoneauctions.com.

Elvis Presley Signed Contract for The Purchase of Graceland in Memphis Sells Online for $114,660 by PristineAuction.com

Phoenix, AZ, USA, September 22, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- The 1957 contract signed by Elvis Presley and both of his parents for the purchase of the home in Memphis that became known as Graceland soared to $114,660 in an online auction held August 10th by PristineAuction.com, based in Phoenix. It was the only lot in the auction. A month later, Beckett named PristineAuction.com its Auction House of the Year for 2021.

“This auction was certainly one of a kind,” said Jared Kavile the president and founder of PristineAuction.com. “The company is proud to be part of the sale of such an incredible piece of history. The legend of The King will always live on, and Graceland is one of the most famous mansions in the world, visited by millions of people from around the globe. To be part of that is an honor.”

The contract was the actual purchase agreement allowing the Presleys to purchase the property at 3764 Highway 51 in Memphis. It was printed on Virginia Grant Realty Company letterhead and included Virginia Grant’s handwritten agreement, stating the Presleys would trade their property on Audubon Drive in Memphis for $55,000 credit, plus an extra $90,000 to purchase Graceland.

When Elvis was a boy, he told his parents one day he would make a lot of money and take care of them, putting an end to their years of hard work and financial struggles. Buying the Graceland mansion was the fulfillment of that childhood promise. Graceland was Elvis’s world. He and his parents lived and died there. For many, Graceland has come to represent the American Dream.

The custom-framed document, 30 inches by 34 inches, was dated March 17, 1957. It was signed by Elvis, his parents (Vernon and Gladys) and agent Virginia Grant, who signed her name in red and black ink pen. The $114,660 purchase price included the buyer’s premium. After Presley’s 1977 death, Graceland was named a National Historic Landmark. It opened to the public in 1982.

Beckett, the internationally respected sports memorabilia authenticating and grading service based in Dallas, each year hosts its Industry Summit Awards, where it recognizes and honors the best and most prominent figures in the autographed memorabilia industry. PristineAuction.com was named Auction House of the Year at this year’s event, held September 12-15 in Las Vegas.

To learn more about PristineAuction.com and the firm’s calendar of upcoming online-only auction events, please visit www.pristineauction.com.

About Pristineauction.Com:
PristineAuction.com holds frequent online-only auctions, featuring rare and highly collectible items in its popular historical auction category. Typically, the best items are offered in sales ending the last Sunday of each month, in their elite auctions. Many of the elite historical items are signed by influential figures such as former presidents, artists, actors and musicians. All are authenticated. PristineAuction.com is a family owned and operated consignment-based online auction house. Since its founding in 2010, the company have grown from a spare bedroom to a 37,000-square-foot facility in Phoenix, Arizona. A team of over 100 people actively services the many customers. The firm specializes in autographed memorabilia, sports cards, coins, art and collectibles. By working with leading authentication companies, it ensures all items offered are 100% authentic. PristineAuction.com offers items certified by trusted names, including Leaf, JSA, PSA, Beckett, Steiner Sports, Schwartz Sports, TriStar, Total Sports Enterprises, Upper Deck Authenticated, and MLB Authentication. PristineAuction.com runs multiple weekly auctions, a premium monthly auction, and daily and 10- minute auctions. In addition to auctions, it has an extensive web store with display cases, custom framing options, and other accessories to display memorabilia. PristineAuction.com is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or an entire collection of sports-related items and memorabilia, you may send an email to sales@pristineauction.com. To learn more about PristineAuction.com, please visit www.pristineauction.com.