Tag Archives: collectibles

Copies of Avengers #1, Amazing Spider-Man #14 and Pokemon TCG Collectibles do well In Bruneau & Co’s Pop Culture Auction

Cranston, RI, USA, July 21, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A copy of Marvel Comics’ Avengers #1 from September 1963 sold for $23,125, a copy of Marvel Comics’ Amazing Spider-Man #14 from July 1964 brought $17,500, and a 1st edition, factory sealed booster box of Wizards of the Coast Pokémon Gym Challenge from 2000 made $17,500 at a Pop Culture auction held July 10th by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers.

“The bidding action this Comic, TCG & Toy auction brought to the gallery takes me back to what was found in similar sales ten, fifteen years ago,” said Kevin Bruneau, president and owner of Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers. “The floor, phones, online were all busy. It shows what direction the business is headed in for the next generation to come.” TCG stands for Trading Card Games.

Travis Landry, Bruneau & Co.’s Director of Pop Culture, added, “This auction proved again how hot the comic and TCG market is. Everything was on fire. I’m happy to say we broke 51 market records for graded books. Most notably, percentage-wise, was the Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1. The day of the auction market average was $1,680, but it ended up hammering for $4,750.”

The copy of Marvel Comics Avengers #1 (Sept. 1963), graded CGC 8.0 and featuring the origin and first appearance of the Avengers, plus appearances by the Fantastic Four, Loki and Teen Brigade, was the expected top lot of the auction and it delivered, selling within its estimate of $18,000-$24,000. Mr. Bruneau called it “the finest copy of Avengers #1 we’ve handled to date.”

Not far behind was the copy of Marvel Comics Amazing Spider-Man #14 (July 1964), graded CGC 9.0 and having a pre-sale estimate of $10,000-$15,000. The comic book featured the very first appearance of the Green Goblin, as well as the first meeting of the Hulk and Spider-Man. Like with Avengers #1, Mr. Bruneau called it the finest example of ASM #14 he’s ever handled.

On to Pokémon, and the ever-popular world of TCG. The Wizards of the Coast Pokémon Gym Challenge 1st edition factory sealed booster box from 2000, a true Holy Grail item for Pokémon / TCG collectors, was a big hit with collectors. Also, a 1999 French Pokémon base 1st edition Dracaufeu (Charizard) holographic trading card, graded BGS 9.5 Gem Mint, finished at $10,000.

A 1999 Wizards of the Coast Pokémon Fossil 1st edition factory sealed booster box with minimal shelf wear and tight WOTC branded cellophane wrap, another Holy Grail item for Pokémon and TCG fans, finished at $13,750. Also, a group of 30 factory-sealed 1999 Pokémon Jungle 1st edition trading card packs in the original booster box made $11,250.

A copy of Marvel Comics’ X-Men #1 (Sept. 1963), featuring the origin and first appearance of the X-Men and Magneto, graded CGC 3.0 with cream/off-white pages, in a CGC case, achieved $13,125. Also, an estate fresh, original owner collection of 115 Hot Wheels redline diecast cars, each car about 3 inches long, all played with and enjoyed, some with more wear than others, including a large grouping of buttons, garnered $9,375.

The first 52 lots in the auction were from the collection of Eric Baker, the creative lead of props and set dressing for The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios and Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disney World and Disneyland. He was also Nickelodeon’s prop master and fabricator. Several props were fabricated by him during his storied career with Nickelodeon.

The second portion of the catalog featured 321 lots of graded CGC and CBCS comic books, in addition to group lots of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comics. The entirety of the recently graded CGC Silver and Bronze age comics came from an original owner New Jersey collection Bruneau & Co. processed this year – truly a great selection of books. The final portion of the catalog included 166 lots of Pokémon trading cards.

The auction overall had more than 550 lots. Internet bidding was via LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com, Bidsquare.com, bidLIVE.Bruneauandco.com and the mobile app “Bruneau & Co.” on iTunes or GooglePlay. All prices quoted in this report included the buyer’s premium.

Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers has several important auctions lined up for the rest of 2021. These include the following:

  • Estate Fine Art & Antiques auction, Thursday, August 19th @ 6 pm Eastern time.
  • Summer Single-Owner Fine Art & Antiques auction (time and date to be announced)
  • Historic Arms & Militaria auction, Saturday, November 20th, @ 10 am Eastern time.
  • Sports Cards & Memorabilia auction (time and date to be announced)

To learn more about Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers and the firm’s calendar of upcoming events, visit www.bruneauandco.com. Updates are posted often.

About Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers:
Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers is accepting quality consignments for these and all future auctions, with commissions as low as zero percent. Now would be a perfect time to clean out your attic. To contact Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers about consigning a single piece or an entire collection, you can send an e-mail to them at info@bruneauandco.com; or, phone them at 401-533-9980. To learn more about Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers visit www.bruneauandco.com.

Important Black Cat Shoe Dressing Clock Rings Up $11,210 (Canadian) in Miller & Miller’s June 19th Online-Only Auction

New Hamburg, Ontario, Canada, June 26, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- An important Black Cat Shoe Dressing clock (known to collectors as “The Black Cat Clock”) sold for $11,210, and an early 20th century Peabody’s Overalls single-sided porcelain sign realized $8,850 in Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd.’s online-only Advertising & Breweriana sale held June 19th. All prices quoted are in Canadian dollars.

“Antique and vintage advertising continues to flex its muscles,” said Ben Lennox of Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. “A whopping 68 percent of the top 50 grossing lots from the 650-lot sale smashed past the high estimate. The desire for high-end advertising continues to climb at a feverish pace with both new and seasoned collectors looking to add rarities to their collections.”

The iconic Nonsuch Black Cat Shoe Polish clock settled in as the top lot, just as one did almost 40 years ago, in 1982, at the famed Bill & Pauline Hogan Collection auction – a sale that really solidified country store antiques and collectibles in Canada. While the clock hammered down $5,400 back then, in the recent sale it more than doubled that, when adding the buyer’s premium.

Well represented throughout the sale were signs and advertising pieces covering tobacciana, breweriana, gas station memorabilia (petroliana), soda pop collectibles and work wear. “In speaking with collectors post-auction,” Lennox said, “the consensus is that the rare and unusual will always attract eager buyers, and this has led to many signs hitting new price benchmarks.”

He added, “There is really no sign of a letup. Country store, service station, general store – whatever term you choose to put around it – the trajectory for advertising antiques continues on an upward trend with no signs of slowing down.” The auction grossed a healthy $389,164 and was headlined by the Peter Rea breweriana collection, a superb assemblage of top-quality pieces.

Following are additional highlights from the auction, which attracted 467 registered bidders, who participated through LiveAuctioneers.com and the Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. website: www.millerandmillerauctions.com. Just under half of lots sold met or exceeded estimates, and 20 percent of lots blew past the high estimate. All prices include an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

The Black Cat Shoe Dressing clock is considered one of the most significant pieces of Canadian advertising ever produced. It depicted a black cat, its jaws and whiskers erect, engaging with the product in pursuit of something beyond. It boasted, “Leads all others / Challenge the world to produce its superior” and was clearly marked lower left, “MacDonald Mfg. Co. Ltd., Toronto”.

The Peabody’s Overalls single-sided porcelain sign, 15 ¼ inches by 48 inches, is one of Canada’s great general store porcelain signs, achieving everything a good sign should. The “Peabody’s Overalls” script spanned the sign, but the humor and salesmanship filled in the blanks: “Wears like a pig’s nose”, “Guaranteed Honorable” and “Railroad King”.

Four lots finished with identical selling prices of $5,015. They were as follows:

  • A Teddy Chocolate Soda single-sided embossed lithographed tin sign (Canadian, 1920s), 13 ½ inches by 20 inches, marked “St. Thomas Metal Signs, St. Thomas, Ontario”.
  • A Ward’s Lime Crush porcelain syrup dispenser (American, 1920s), the rarest of the three Ward’s figural syrup dispensers, with a ball style pump, 14 inches tall by 9 inches.
  • A Forest & Stream Tobacco lithographed heavy cardboard die-cut sign (Canadian, 1930s), 39 inches by 41 inches, with remnants of an easel on the rear, for counter display.
  • A Firestone Tires double-sided porcelain wall mounting porcelain flange sign (1940s), marked “Made in USA”, 36 inches by 28 ¼ inches, with no restoration or color touch-up.

A circa 1938 Orange Crush porcelain sign, although not marked, was certainly a product of St. Thomas Metal Signs, Ltd. (Canada). The store side sign was made from self-framed heavy-gauge pressed steel with heavy-shelved porcelain and went for $4,720. Also, a Stubby Soda vertical tin lithographed sign (Canadian, 1940s), changed hands for $4,425. The single-sided embossed sign, measuring 47 ½ inches by 17 ¼ inches, was marked “CCC WS166” to lower right and left edge.

The Kuntz Brewery beer tray is among Canada’s most sought-after beer trays. It’s called “The Bologna Girl” because the subject, a young woman, is shown serving a bologna sandwich alongside a bottle of Kuntz Export Lager. The tray in the auction, 13 ¾ inches in diameter, was marked, “Kaufmann & Strauss Co. N.Y.” It finished under estimate, gaveling for $3,540.

A Brading Brewery Company early Canadian paper-under-glass lithograph from the 1910s, featuring the Brading’s “Stag” trademark icon flanked by the product, 23 ½ inches by 33 inches (sight), knocked down for $4,720. Also, a Kuntz Park Brewery lithographed paper, extremely rare, featuring a vignette of the Waterloo (Canada) brewery, followed by photos depicting the various equipment involved at each stage of the brewing process, framed, commanded $4,130.

A Regal Brewery (Hamilton, Ontario, 1920s) lithographed tin beaver tray, among Canada’s most sought after beer trays, featuring an outdoor scene with two beavers constructing a dam by a riverside, 13 ½ inches in diameter, brought $4,425. Also, a Pay Roll Tobacco single-sided tin lithographed sign (Canadian, 1920s), measuring 16 ¾ inches by 11 inches and marked bottom right, “The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. Ltd. Montreal”, went to s determined bidder for $3,540.

A Teddy Chocolate Soda single-sided lithographed tin sign (Canadian, 1930s), a product of Renfrew Bottling Works, 13 ½ inches by 20 inches and marked bottom center, “St. Thomas Metal Signs Ltd., St. Thomas, Ont.”, went for $4,130; while a Stubby Root Beer single-sided embossed lithographed tin sign (Canadian, 1940s), 19 ¼ inches by 27 ¼ inches, hit $3,540.

Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. has three major auctions planned for autumn, all of them falling on a Saturday. A Toys & Nostalgia auction featuring the Bryan Beatty collection will be held on September 11th; a Canadiana sale is scheduled for October 9th; and a Watches & Jewels auction will take place on November 20th. All will be online-only.

To learn more about Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. and the auctions planned for fall, please visit www.MillerandMillerAuctions.com.

Brian Lebel’s Cody Old West Show with 65 Top Vendors will be Held June 25-27 at The Santa Fe Community Convention Center

Santa Fe, NM, USA, June 15, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Veteran collectors of Western and Native American memorabilia, or anyone considering dipping their toes into this red-hot category of collectible, need to mark their calendars for June 25th-27th. Those are the dates for this year’s Brian Lebel’s Cody Old West Show, to be held in the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, at 201 West Marcy Street.

Vendors from across the country will be there, specializing in authentic Western fine art, collectibles, apparel, home decor, jewelry, antique firearms, Native American artifacts, cowboy trappings, horse gear, books, boots, hats and more. Contemporary artists and artisans will be included. The merchandise includes antique, vintage and modern, spanning all price points.

“It was touch-and-go for a while as to whether or not we would be able to hold this year’s show, but we couldn’t be happier that we’re able to move forward,” said Brian Lebel, who’s been staging Old West Shows since 1989, initially in Cody, Wyoming. “Summer in Santa Fe is a shopper’s paradise, and we are proud to be the show that gets to kick off the summer season.”

Because of the wide variety of material available at the show — from cowboy to Native American, from old to new, and from inexpensive to lavish — it’s often difficult to explain to people what exactly the show is like, Lebel said. “But one thing is for certain: after someone’s first visit, they come back every year. It’s a special event with a community like none other.”

Lebel added, “We’ve missed everyone and are really looking forward to seeing all of our friends and colleagues again.” He explained that, due to COVID occupancy restrictions, the total number of vendors had to be reduced to about 65 to allow for the most shoppers to be able to attend. It will be a buy, sell and trade event, with many vendors happy to offer impromptu appraisals.

“Our vendors are among the best in the business, and are extremely generous with both their time and knowledge, Lebel pointed out. “Even if you don’t buy anything, you’re guaranteed to learn something.” Show hours are 9am to 3pm Mountain time on June 26th and 27th, with general admission priced at $10 per day, or $15 for a two-day pass. Those under 12 and over 70 are free.

Lebel encouraged attendees to check out early buy-in, which is available “for the serious collector” during Friday’s June 25th vendor set-up, from 9am to 5 pm. Guests get to shop while the dealers unpack, for first-look at the merchandise. The cost is $100 and entitles the buyer to access during all vendor hours all weekend, as well as an invitation to the Friday night VIP party.

For eats, Santa Fe’s Cowgirl BBQ will be set-up in the outdoor courtyard, selling food and drinks, including cold beer, wine and their famous margaritas. Bargain-conscious attendees should know that discount coupons are available in local print ads and at galleries and shops around Santa Fe. The show has grown into a major annual event in just four years in Santa Fe.

Sandwiched between early buy-in (June 25th) and the show’s final day (June 27th), Brian Lebel will hold the 31st annual Cody Old West Auction on Saturday, June 26th, at 4 pm Mountain time, with live, in-person bidding at the nearby Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza located at 100 Sandoval Street in Santa Fe, as well as online via the Old West Events website, www.oldwestevents.com.

The auction is packed with 384 total lots and will feature several important collections, including the estate collections of antique firearms and Native American baskets from James Carpenter; the impressive miniature saddle collection and antique Americana collection of Earl Hagerman; badges from the collection of Bob Vines; buckles from the collection of Judge Howard Gross; and a superb group of horsehair bridles from noted collectors and authors Ned and Jody Martin.

Major categories will include cowboy antiques and collectibles (saddles, spurs, bits, etc.); Native American artifacts; antique and historic firearms; Hollywood cowboy memorabilia; Western fine art; Old West gambling and saloon items; antique and contemporary belt buckles and other silverwork; antique advertising and lithography; and Western decorative arts and furniture. The auction is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Reservations are required for a seat.

Currently underway is Lebel’s Rest of the West, an online-only auction with 120 lots, all unreserved and with estimates of under $1,000. Bidding is live now, at www.oldwestevents.com, and will end on June 26th at 11:55 pm Mountain time. Collectors on a budget, or anyone considering easing into the fast-growing field of Western collectibles should check it out.

To learn more about Brian Lebel’s Old West Events and the show and auction on June 25th-27th, please visit www.oldwestevents.com.

About Brian Lebel’s Old West Events:
Brian Lebel founded the Cody Old West Show & Auction 31 years ago in Cody, Wyoming as a small gathering of people who were buying, selling and trading in the antiques and artifacts of the American cowboy and the American West. Brian believed that more people would appreciate these great artifacts if only they were aware of what was available, so he launched his own event. Brian Lebel’s Old West Shows and Old West Auctions are held every January in Mesa, Arizona, and every June in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Each annual event consists of a weekend vendor sale with hundreds of dealers, plus an exciting, live Saturday night auction. Both the events feature the best authentic Western art, antiques and artifacts available for public sale. Old West Events is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece, an estate or a collection, you may call them at 480-779-WEST (9378), or, you can email them at contactus@oldwestevents.com. To learn more, please visit www.oldwestevents.com

Western Collectibles Galore at Brian Lebel’s Cody Old West Auction on Saturday, June 26th, in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Santa Fe, NM, USA, June 10, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- The roll-top desk and chair used by Pat Garrett while he was sheriff in Dona Ana, New Mexico, an Arizona Ranger Colt Frontier six-shooter, a circa 1863 Henry repeating rifle, J.B. Farr’s 14kt gold presentation sheriff’s badge and actor Clint Eastwood’s film-worn hat from the movie Joe Kidd are just a hint of what bidders can expect at the 31st annual Cody Old West Auction scheduled for Saturday, June 26th, starting promptly at 4 pm Mountain time.

The event is being held by Brian Lebel’s Old West Events, with live, in-person bidding at the Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza located at 100 Sandoval Street in Santa Fe, as well as online via the Old West Events website, www.oldwestevents.com. As with past events, the auction will be part of a three-day Old West Show, June 25-27, also hosted by Old West Events, in the nearby Santa Fe Community Convention Center at 201 West Marcy Street. Both are open to the public.

The auction is packed with 384 total lots and will feature several important collections, including the estate collections of antique firearms and Native American baskets from James Carpenter; the impressive miniature saddle collection and antique Americana collection of Earl Hagerman; badges from the collection of Bob Vines; buckles from the collection of Judge Howard Gross; and a superb group of horsehair bridles from noted collectors and authors Ned and Jody Martin.

Major categories will include cowboy antiques and collectibles (saddles, spurs, bits, etc.); Native American artifacts; antique and historic firearms; Hollywood cowboy memorabilia; Western fine art; Old West gambling and saloon items; antique and contemporary belt buckles and other silverwork; antique advertising and lithography; and Western decorative arts and furniture. The auction is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Reservations are required for a seat.

“We’re thrilled to be able to hold the auction and show after having to cancel last June’s events due to COVID,” said Old West Events owner Brian Lebel. “2021 has been an excellent year so far for sales in our business as well as in related industries. We’re eager to continue this trend and are looking forward to seeing all the faces we’ve been missing this past year,” adding, “This year’s auction promises to be a great one, with a lot of diversity both in price ranges and genres.”

The roll-top desk and chair used by Pat Garrett as Dona Ana County sheriff from 1896-1900 were both made in the 1880s. Their condition is poor but they can be refurbished. The lot has an estimate of $10,000-$20,000 and comes with the original 1884 bill of sale and a photo of Garrett. The Colt single-action Army revolver with one-piece ivory grips was manufactured in 1895 and was shipped to Colt’s Patent Firearms in San Francisco in 1898. It was originally owned by O. Frank Hicks, who enlisted in the Arizona Rangers in 1905. It should sell for $20,000-$25,000.

The circa 1863 Henry repeating rifle (S/N 1729, .44 rimfire caliber), has a 24-inch barrel, a brass frame and blue finish, walnut stocks, original sights, matching numbers and extra sight dove tail in the frame. It is expected to hammer for $20,000-$30,000. J. B. Farr’s early 1900s 14kt gold presentation sheriff’s badge is an important piece of Colorado history and a great example of a presentation badge – highly detailed, elegant and ornate. It should top out at $8,000-$12,000.

Clint Eastwood’s film-worn hat from the 1972 Western movie Joe Kidd is a Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors dark brown beaver Stetson hat, 3X, with an inverted crown and a braided leather “whip” hatband. It has a pre-sale estimate of $8,000-$12,000. A wonderful example of a Florence State Penitentiary (Ariz.) horsehair bridle, with triple strand round cheeks and a double brow band boasts colors that are bright and done in a tight diamond pattern, should realize $8,000-$12,000.

A pair of Visalia “Wild West” pattern spurs, impressive and hefty, marked inside the heelband, “Visalia Stock Saddle Co. / San Francisco”, priced at a steep $35 in the Visalia 1922 catalog, is expected to finish at $8,000-$12,000. Also, a J. Tapia target pattern spade bit, an elaborate, multi-spotted silver inlaid California spade bit with multiple rows of dots forming a central target pattern on each cheek, shown in John Foy’s 1890s saddlery catalog, should hit $9,000-$12,000.

An exquisite ladies’ three-piece buckle set created by Scott Hardy for the 2006 Traditional Cowboy Arts Association’s (TCAA) annual exhibition and sale, with three sets of engraved and diamond gold hinges, has an estimate of $6,000-$9,000. A circa 1920-1930 Native American Kiowa tanned and sinew-sewn deer hide shirt with 17-inch-long fringe on the shoulders, a deer tail hanging from the back and decorative beadwork, should change hands for $7,000-$9,000.

A hand-carved wooden bull’s head with real horns from the Bulls Head Saloon in Abilene Kansas, which belonged to the notable Old West personality “Shotgun” Ben Thompson, whose partner was shot and killed by “Wild Bill” Hickok, is estimated at $6,000-$8,000. Also, a King Ranch “Running W” floral tooled ranch saddle with 14-inch seat and Cheyenne roll cantle, gifted by original owner Robert “Bob” Kleberg to an ailing friend, should command $5,000-$7,000.

An oil on board gunfight painting by Frank McCarthy (1924-2002), 20 inches by 12 inches (sight, less frame), used as an illustration for the book Sangre en la Colina (Blood on the Hill), artist signed, is expected to achieve $4,000-$6,000. Native American baskets from the James Carpenter collection will be led by a large early 1900s Mission (Calif.) polychrome basket bowl, woven with sumac, natural and mud dyed juncus reed, 12 inches tall (Estimate: $2,500-$3,000).

Currently underway is Lebel’s Rest of the West, an online-only auction with 120 lots, all unreserved and with estimates of under $1,000. Bidding is live now, at www.oldwestevents.com, and will end on June 26th at 11:55 pm Mountain time. Collectors on a budget, or anyone considering easing into the fast-growing field of Western collectibles should check it out.

To learn more about Brian Lebel’s Old West Events and the events planned for later this month, please visit www.oldwestevents.com.

1884 Winchester Cartridge Display Board Rings Up $100,300 in Miller & Miller’s Canadiana & Sporting Auction, June 5th

New Hamburg, Ontario, Canada, June 10, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- Three 19th century American cartridge display boards – two from Winchester (1887 and 1884) and one from Union Metallic Cartridge (1880s) – sold for a combined $241,900 in an online-only Canadiana & Sporting auction held June 5th by Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. The sale grossed $496,219, including the buyer’s premium.

All prices quoted in this report are in Canadian dollars.

The abovementioned cartridge display boards were the top lots of the auction. All three were lithographed cardboard, with an applied representation of Winchester’s line of ammunition. Few survived intact due to their monumental size and the fact they were often displayed in store windows and areas exposed to light. They are highly prized by collectors.

The Winchester 1884 cartridge display board was the top lot of the auction overall, breezing past its pre-sale estimate of $20,000-$25,000 to finish at a robust $100,300. It measured 28 inches by 38 inches. Runner-up honors went to the 1887 Winchester board, which had the same estimate and brought $88,500. The Union Metallic Cartridge Company board placed third, at $53,100.

The auction was headlined by the lifetime collections of Don and Joyce Blyth – an astounding assemblage of stoneware, sporting advertising, decoys, powder tins, soda water bottles, ginger beer bottles, beer bottles, Canadiana and more. In all, 289 lots came up for bid, with 99 percent of them finding new owners. Over half of the lots sold met or exceeded their pre-sale estimates.

Don and Joyce Blyth were both avid collectors until Don’s recent passing. Included in the auction was a nearly comprehensive collection of Guelph merchant stoneware and bottles, among other pieces of Guelph, Ontario memorabilia. Also on offer were Don’s collections of Canadian gun powder tins, decoys, sporting and firearms advertising and other items.

“I interviewed Don three days before his death,” said Ethan Miller of Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. “What he had was museum quality material. I asked him, ‘Why did you not donate it?’ He said, ‘Let the people enjoy it.’ His intention has now been realized. The stoneware pieces sold strongly, and the rarest of the offering crushed the high estimates. All in all, it was a great sale.”

Joyce Blyth, who survives her husband and who attended the auction, said, “Never in our wildest dreams did we think that the cartridge boards had such value. Don would have been thrilled.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. Internet bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com and the Miller & Miller website: www.MillerandMillerAuctions.com. A total of 321 registered bidders placed 5,838 bids. Thirty percent of all lots sold surpassed even their high estimate figures. All prices quoted are inclusive of an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

Stoneware was led by a rare three-gallon jug produced in the 1870s by F. P. Goold and featuring a race horse decoration in cobalt slip. It was made during Goold’s tenure at the Brantford pottery in Canada ($20,060). Also, a two-gallon jug debossed, “Robt. Rutherford Guelph”, boasting an outstanding bird decoration, gaveled for $7,080. The jug appears on the cover of Joyce Blyth’s book, Jugs & Crocks of the Guelph Merchants.

Another F. P. Goold jug, this one a two-gallon example, 14 inches tall and debossed, “F. P. Goold Brantford”, having a few very small scratches or scrapes mostly on the front of the jug, changed hands for $5,605. Also, an extremely rare Watson Brothers miniature jug, standing just 3 ½ inches tall and debossed, “Compliments of Watson Bros. Guelph, Ont.”, produced at the Brantford pottery during W.E. Welding’s tenure, went for $4,130.

Tops in the decoys category was a rare and important early gunning longtailed duck, circa 1880s-1940s, likely made by either Jimmy or William Clark of Toronto and Keswick, Ontario ($8,260); and a first quarter 20th century Burlington Bay canvasback by Ivar Gustav Fernlund (Hamilton, Ont., 1881-1933), hollow, with a structurally excellent bottom board, beautiful wet combed paint and a bold and elegant high head ($7,670).

A first quarter 20th century hollow bluebill decoy by Henry (Hen) Freeborn (Hamilton, Ont., 1882-1959), in excellent gunning condition with strong paint and winner of a CDOCA Best Bluebill contest, fetched $4,720. The bottles category was led by a W. Atkinson, Guelph C.W. (Canada West) primitive pint stone ginger beer bottle, believed to be the only one in existence and made sometime in the late 19th century, sold for $4,130.

Returning to sporting collectibles, a Canadian Dominion Cartridge Company exhibition board, wood with applied ammunition, reportedly made for a display at the 1901 Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo, N.Y., achieved $9,440; and a 1902 American Winchester double “W” cartridge display board, featuring detailed lithographed images of the ammunition instead of the applied cartridges, 39 ¾ inches by 57 ½ inches, hit $8,260.

An early 20th century Canadian Dominion Ammunition store counter display made from painted chalkware, originally from the Bright, Ontario general store, marked “Petrucci Freres Statuaires Montreal”, sold for $6,490. Also, two Stelco Sample Shot display cases, one from the 1930s and one from the 1950s, both displaying the various sizes of lead shot manufactured by The Steel Company of Canada, Ltd. (Stelco), knocked down for $3,835.

Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. has two more auctions planned for June: a Watches & Jewels auction on Saturday, June 12th and an Advertising & Breweriana auction on June 19th. Both will be online-only. In the fall, a Canadiana & Historic Objects auction is planned for October 9th.

To learn more about Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd., please visit www.MillerandMillerAuctions.com. Updates are posted frequently.

About Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd.:
Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd. is Canada’s trusted seller of high-value collections and is always accepting quality consignments. The firm specializes in watches and jewelry, art, antiques and high-value collectibles. Its mission is to provide collectors with a trusted place to buy and sell. To consign a single piece, an estate or a collection, you may call them at (519) 573-3710; or, you can e-mail them at info@millerandmillerauctions.com. To learn more about Miller & Miller Auctions, Ltd., please visit www.MillerandMillerAuctions.com.

Rare Scientific Manuscript Penned by Sir Isaac Newton Brings $118,750 in University Archives’ May 26th Online Auction

Wilton, CT, USA –– A manuscript penned by Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727), with mathematical notes and calculations relating to Book III of his iconic scientific work Principia, changed hands for $118,750 in University Archives’ online-only auction of rare autographs, manuscripts, artwork and comic art held on May 26th. It was the top-selling item of the 409 lots in the sale.

“We’re still experiencing strong prices and keen new interests in many areas,” said University Archives president and owner John Reznikoff. “We’ve sold over three million dollars of items at auction so far this year, and we are not even at the halfway mark. This is another banner year.”

The rare and important two-page (front and back) manuscript, written by Newton circa 1715-1725, was believed to relate to Newton’s De Mundi Systemate (or Book III of the Principia). It was a set of mathematical notes containing several types of calculations and data points. One side was just calculations; the other side had a short note by Newton along with a calculation.

The text of the note reads, in part, “And that of Aldebaran and of Spica and that of Arcturus counting these longitudes not from the middes of the signes but from the Vernal Equinox/ And so of the rest of the fixed stars.” Newton was referencing the longitudinal position of Aldebaran and other stars, plus data points relating to his revolutionary study of comets.

Isaac Newton is widely recognized as one of the greatest mathematicians and most influential scientists of all time and was a key figure in the scientific revolution. In Principia, he formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation that formed the dominant scientific viewpoint (until it was superseded by Einstein’s theory of relativity). Einstein was also featured in the auction.

Items pertaining to Newton are exceedingly rare and highly sought after by collectors. The last time a Newton Principia-related autograph manuscript came on the market was October 1999 and, before that, 1991 and 1979. Newton was a notorious hoarder of paper and of his own manuscripts; the preservation of this manuscript note was unusual even for him.

Following are additional highlights from the auction, which was a success by any yardstick. Nearly all lots (396 of 409) found new owners, for a 97 percent sell-through and a total gross of $678,043. The 4,654 people who registered to bid on Invaluable.com and Auctionzop.com placed 1,224 bids, while the 4,239 people who registered to bid on LiveAuctioneers.com placed 596 bids. All prices quoted include the buyer’s premium.

The items relating to Albert Einstein included a three-page scientific manuscript pertaining to his Unified Field Theory from the 1940s (“I want to try to show that a truly natural choice for field equations exists”) ($68,750); and a black and white photo signed by Einstein, taken in 1955 by photographer Yousuf Karsh, who said the image reveals the “brief moment when all there is in a man’s mind and soul and spirit are reflected through his eyes, his hands, his attitude” ($34,375).

A Victorian autograph album compiled by Pennsylvania Congressman William M. Davis that contained 226 signatures of Lincoln administration officials as well as members of the 37th U.S. Congress, including President Abraham Lincoln himself and seven of his eight cabinet members (Hamlin, Seward, Chase, Bates, Welles, Cameron and Smith), and the autographs of about 217 statesmen, including Lincoln’s eventual successor, Andrew Johnson, hammered for $37,500.

A typed letter signed by Vladimir Lenin as Chairman of the Workers’ and Peasants’ Defense Council during the Russian Civil War was addressed to a future victim of Stalinist Purges, the People’s Commissariat Artemic B. Khalatov. The letter, dated Dec. 19, 1919, was in Russian and typed in the Cyrillic alphabet. Lenin wished Khalatov a speedy recovery and a swift return to work. Ironically, Lenin’s successor, Josef Stalin, later ordered Khalatov’s execution ($25,000).

A one-page, partly printed ship’s paper dated Nov. 25, 1794 boldly signed by George Washington as president, issued to “James Humphrey master or commander of the Sloop called Hiram”, printed in three languages, brought $15,000. Also, a rare autograph letter signed by Woodrow Wilson as president on White House stationery, dated May 19, 1913, addressed to author and editor James Grant Wilson regarding the dedication of a U.S.S. Maine monument, fetched $13,750.

An Act of Congress signed in type by George Washington as President and John Adams as Vice President on May 8, 1794, permanently establishing the U.S. Postal Service and making robbing the mails a crime punishable by death, rose to $12,500. Also, a one-page autograph letter signed by the prominent British Methodist preacher John Wesley (1703-1791), written at Derby, England on July 12, 1788 with content regarding a children’s school, knocked down for $5,938.

A two-page letter typed and signed by author J.D. Salinger (as “Jerry”), dated May 5, 1972, in which he offers his thoughts on a dating interest of a friend and aspiring writer, Eileen Paddison, including the original “Air Mail” envelope, reached $8,125. Also, Beat writer Jack Kerouac’s personal advance copy of The Twelfth Anniversary Playboy Reader (1965), gifted to Kerouac (as a contributor) by Hugh Hefner and accompanied by a typed letter signed by Hefner, hit $8,125.

An 8 inch by 10 inch photograph signed by Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks, showing Parks getting fingerprinted after her arrest in 1955 for not relinquishing her seat to a white person, signed in felt-tip pen on her sleeve, finished at $5,000; while three items related to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and its first president, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., including a letter in which King questions the wisdom of the “Black Power” slogan, sold for $4,375.

An actual piece of fabric from the Wright Flyer, the first airplane that made its debut flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on Dec. 17, 1903, famously giving wings to mankind, 1 ¼ inch square in a CAG case, flew away for $6,875. Also, a map of Israel hand-drawn and signed by former Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, drawn during the time of the 1993 Oslo Accords and providing detail to both the West Bank and Gaza Strip, 5 ½ inches by 9 inches, hit $4,688.

Future online auctions for University Archives will feature presidential items (from Washington to Trump), literary giants (Kerouac, Shelley, Proust and others); space and aviation (U.S., the Soviet Union, etc.) and other categories. Visit www.UniversityArchives.com for more details.

For more information about University Archives please visit www.universityarchives.com.