Tag Archives: photographs

Signed and Numbered Ansel Adams Photos and Gold Rush-Era Tokens do Well in Holabird’s December Dreams Auction Dec. 17-19

Reno, NV, USA, January 5, 2022 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A Wells Fargo Express Chinese Western directory from 1878 sold for $13,750, while signed and numbered photographs by Western photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984) and rare tokens from the glory days of America’s Gold Rush era all did well in Holabird Western Americana Collections’ December Dreams: Premier Americana Auction held December 17-19.

The three-day sale, held online and live at the Holabird gallery in Reno, featured over 1,900 lots of rare books, art, mining, numismatics, stock certificates, postcards and more. Highlighted collections included more parts of the Ken Prag postcard collection, the Bill McIver token and medal collection, the MacKenzie Montana collection and the Ron Lerch Western collection.

Following are highlights from the auction, which enjoyed an 80 percent sell-through across all 1,900 lots. About 7,500 people registered to bid, with the top categories being art, directories and numismatics. “We’re attracting hundreds of new collectors with each sale that goes by,” said Fred Holabird of Holabird Western Americana Collections. All prices include buyer’s premium.

Day 1 contained over 600 lots of philatelic (stamps); military, political and firearms; gaming collectibles; and model railroad and toys. Postcards, many of them from the Ken Prag collection, included California (especially wine country), Hawaii, Disney, Titanic and Pioneer cards. The gaming section included items from the Shirley Bovis Cowboy Museum in Tombstone, Ariz.

Of the 500 postcard lots from the Ken Prag collection, about 350 lots were California-related, but 40 lots or so were Hawaii-themed. Lot 1370 was a collection of more than 210 postcards with color renderings of rare and exotic fishes of Hawaii. Most were from a series published for the Waikiki Aquarium in Honolulu. All were from the early 20th century. The lot went for $1,387.

Day 2 was packed with 683 lots of books (featuring Part 1 of the Ron Leach Western directory collection); mining artifacts and ephemera; and stock certificates and bonds, to include mining and railroad. There were about 200 directories from the Ron Lerch collection. Directories are considered a “primary source” material and, as such, are essential aspects of historical research.

The Wells Fargo Express Chinese directory from 1878 is one of the most sought-after, rare and important of all the Western directories and sold accordingly, for $13,750. It was a directory for Chinese houses in San Francisco, Sacramento, Stockton, Marysville, San Jose, Portland and Virginia City for that year. It was well-used and worn, with Chinese notes on pages throughout.

Other noteworthy directories, all from the Ron Leach collection, included the following:

  • A first edition copy of the Hawaiian Kingdom Statistical and Commercial Directory from 1880-1881, including a tourist guide. Each island in the Kingdom was listed, along with officials, principal villages and descriptions of the islands, plus colored ads ($2,250).
  • A Brown’s Marysville (Calif.) Directory for the year beginning March 1861, a general and business register of citizens with statistical tables, historical references and more, prefaced by sketches of industrial enterprises and charitable organizations ($7,810).
  • A very rare copy of the A.R. Dunbar &Co.’s Chinese Mercantile Directory for 1897, listing all the principal Chinese merchants and manufacturers in the U.S., Canada and Hawaii, 216 pages from the press of Brown, Meese & Craddock, San Francisco ($8,435).

Other Day 2 highlights included a handbill issued by Wells Fargo in 1866 (Gold Hill, Nevada), extolling the thefts of company monies used by several WF agents to gamble on mining stocks ($3,375); and a Britton & Rey lithograph depicting a pair of life scenes of gold miners in the 19th century, titled Bar Room in the Mines and Long Tom, one of only five known copies ($1,625).

A rare stereo view of gold miner Ed Schieffelin (who founded Tombstone, Arizona in 1877), showing him with a pick, breaking a rock, taken by Charles O. Farciot, hammered for $3,125. Also, a stock certificate for 42 shares from 1863 for the Byron Gold & Silver Mining Co. (Sutro, Nevada), a company mentioned by Mark Twain in a letter dated Feb. 3, 1863, finished at $812.

Day 3 was a busy one, with 614 lots of Native Americana (baskets and jewelry), art (featuring Ansel Adams, three signed Salvador Dali prints, Thomas Kincaide, Japanese woodblocks and prints and more), numismatics (including coins and currency, medals and so-called dollars), tokens (featuring Part 2 of the Bill McIvor Nevada token collection), and general Americana.

The signed and numbered photographs by Ansel Adams were from a special edition of fine prints from Photographs of Yosemite (Calif.) by Ansel Adams. Images included Moon and Half Dome, the tenth print made of this world-class photograph from 1960 ($9,687); Bridal Veil Fall, from circa 1958-1970 ($7,500); and El Capitan in Winter, also printed circa 1958-1970 ($5,625).

Offerings from the Bill McIver Nevada token and medal collection included the centerpiece of his collection: possibly the finest known 12.5-cent token from The Payteller (Rhyolite, Nev.), showing a bearded miner with a pick, shovel and lunch bucket, plus a mountain and rising sun ($5,500); and a Copper Block Buffet (Valdez, Alaska) gold nugget token, good for $1 ($2,625).

Other tokens included an extremely rare Rhyolite token for the Southern Bar (“Good for a Drink or Cigar”), very rare, round in shape, 24mm, made by L.A. Rubber Stamp Company ($2,125); and a Victor Venturino token from the Eureka County (Nev.) town of Mineral Hill (“Good for 12 ½ Cents in Trade”), round in shape, 25mm, with what appeared to be a plug or a hole ($2,500).

A great numismatic rarity was found in an 1851 letter. Prior to the establishment of a Branch US Mint in California, private firms made their own gold coins. Some came under fire in 1851 for not containing sufficient gold. These firms, including Dunbar & Co., were “attacked” in the local press, which adversely affected their value. Reacting to this adversity, the letter addresses how Dunbar would cure and defect. It is the first original document to discuss this important period.

The letter was signed by Dunbar & Co. and dated March 31, 1851, noting the receipt of 192 9/16 ounces of gold dust at $17.125 per ounce to be paid in Dunbar & Co.’s (gold) coin on demand, “or if said coin will not pay at par at the time of such demand, the amount shall be redeemed at the office of Dodge & Co. in current silver at the hands of Henry D. Cogswell.” It made $2,500.

A pair of magnificent signed and labeled art prints by the renowned Japanese landscape artist Hiroshi Yoshida (1876-1950), titled Kura at Tomonoura and Lugano, each signed in pencil and both 10 ¼ inches by 15 ½ inches, went for $3,125. Also, a scarce signed and numbered print by the Spanish Surrealist master Salvador Dali, titled Thumb Tree (although the actual title of the work wasn’t found online and is therefore unknown), numbered “59/350”, realized $2,625.

Native Americana was led by a Tlingit Indian basket, 8 inches in diameter and 4 inches tall, with seven swastikas false embroidered into the middle band, circa 1900 ($1,000); a large Haida (Alaska) ornate design box with patterns on all sides with shell inlays as eyes of birds and animals, plus typical red and black patterns ($625); and a vintage, museum-quality sterling silver and turquoise squash blossom necklace, unmarked, with 20 gorgeous turquoise stones ($938).

Online bidding was via iCollector.com, LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com, Auctionzip.com. Holabird Western Americana Collections is always seeking quality consignments for future auctions. To consign a single piece or a collection, you may call Fred Holabird at 775-851-1859 or 844-492-2766; or, you can send an e-mail to fredholabird@gmail.com.

To learn more about Holabird Western Americana Collections, visit www.holabirdamericana.com. Updates are posted often.

Items Signed by Einstein, JFK, MLK, Lincoln, Washington, Many Others in University Archives’ Jan. 6 Online-Only Auction

Wilton, CT, USA, December 22, 2022 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A manuscript handwritten in German by Albert Einstein, signed, with several lines of mathematical equations, a check made out to a charter airline by John F. Kennedy during his 1960 presidential campaign, and a handwritten document signed by the legendary lawman Bat Masterson when he was just 25 years old will all be part of University Archives’ next online-only auction scheduled for Thursday, January 6th, beginning promptly at 10:30 am Eastern time.

The Rare Autographs, Photographs, Books Plus PSA Slabbed auction features historical material from multiple collecting categories. A 201-lot subset will exclusively feature pieces that are PSA/DNA slabbed and graded. “As many in the industry well know, items in this format, once solely the territory of sports cards, have taken the collectibles field to the next level, with frequent realizations into the multi-million-dollar range,” said John Reznikoff, president and owner of University Archives.

Mr. Reznikoff added, “While old-school collectors tend to be more tactile, the new breeds favor a new way to secure their investments, that is, by having items third party-graded, authenticated, and permanently protected. Even Wall Street is on board, with Steve Cohen and others’ billion-dollar purchase of Collectors Universe, the parent company of PSA. This being our biggest sale yet, we’re confident there will be great opportunities for dealers and collectors of all categories.”

The catalog, with all 530+ lots, is up for viewing and bidding now, on the University Archives website (www.UniversityArchives.com) as well as LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com. Phone and absentee bids will also be accepted. It’s the ninth auction that will be conducted from University Archives’ modern, new 6,000-square-foot facilities in Wilton, Conn.

The list of major categories is extensive, to include Science (Einstein, Richard Feynman, Nikola Tesla, Johannes Stark, others); Presidents (from Washington to Biden); Early American (Alexander Hamilton, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Thomas Paine, John Peter Zenger, others); Space / Aviation (the Apollo and Skylab programs, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Chuck Yaeger, Soviet cosmonauts, others); and Civil Rights (Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, others).

Other categories include Business (Astor, Carnegie, Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Jay Cooke, Jay Gould, others); Literature (Mark Twain, Robert Browning, Walt Whitman, J.D. Salinger, Eugene O’Neill, E.E. Cummings, others); Art (Picasso, Chagall, Warhol, Diego Rivera, others); Music (Beatles, Led Zeppelin, George Gershwin, others); Entertainment (Golden Age of Hollywood, Marx Brothers, Marilyn Monroe, others); and Sports (Mantle, Koufax, Jackie Robinson, others).

Taking center stage will be the Einstein autograph manuscript, handwritten in German circa 1938 and signed at its conclusion as “A. Einstein.” It carries a pre-sale estimate of $40,000-$50,000. The manuscript constitutes part of Einstein’s attempts at developing a unified theory of electromagnetism, gravitation and quantum mechanics; he later co-authored a paper exploring this topic titled On a Generalization of Kaluza’s Theory of Electricity (1938).

The check that JFK made out to a Massachusetts charter airline company for a trip to the Kennedy Compound in Hyannisport, Mass., during his 1960 presidential campaign carries an estimate of $15,000-$16,000. The check is boldly signed and signature PSA/DNA slabbed and graded NM-MT 8. Also up for bid is a first edition copy of The President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy, signed by all seven commission members and general counsel J. Lee Rankin.

An autograph document signed by Bartholomew “Bat” Masterson, with over 30 words, numbers and figures written in his hand, is PSA/DNA slabbed and graded Mint 9. When he signed this 6.375-inch by 4.5-inch receipt, the 25-year-old Masterson was then serving as Sheriff of Ford County, Kansas and was just months away from being defeated in the Royal Gorge War, fought between two rival Western railroad companies. The document should finish at $27,500-$30,000.

A letter handwritten by Abraham Lincoln, dated March 25, 1852, is boldly signed and addressed to Hon. William Thomas, regarding real estate business in Shawneetown, Ill. The 7.5-inch by 4 inch letter is PSA/DNA slabbed and graded Mint 9 (estimate: $12,000-$15,000). Also, a one-page document from around 1762 signed by George Washington, regarding a settlement of accounts with Sheriff William Payne of Fairfax County, Va., should hit $12,000-$14,000. The two had a contentious history: Payne had struck Washington with a stick during a disagreement seven years earlier.

Another Washington-related lot – this one a Rev War free frank addressed in his hand to Gen. Henry Knox (1750-1806), Commandant of West Point, signed as “Go: Washington”, PSA/DNA slabbed and graded NM 7 – has an estimate of $8,000-$9,000. Knox was a close friend of Washington, who appointed him the country’s first Secretary of War.

One page of a bifolium dated Dec. 12, 1792, boldly signed by Alexander Hamilton as Treasury Secretary and addressed to Sharp Delany, Esq., Collector of Customs in Philadelphia, instructing him ironically to order pistols, should finish at $9,000-$10,000. Also, a one-page note signed by Thomas Jefferson as President, dated Sept. 13, 1808, written from his home in Monticello, addressed to Edgar Patterson, a government contractor, regarding a letter from Patterson that was forwarded to James Madison, has a pre-sale estimate of $8,000-$9,000.

A two-page autograph manuscript by Richard Feynman, pertaining to the Challenger disaster of 1986, is expected to make $12,000-$14,000. Feynman was appointed to the Rogers Commission, tasked by then-Pres. Ronald Reagan with investigating the causes of the space shuttle’s mid-air explosion. Also, an archive of handwritten documents and printed journals relating to John Peter Zenger, the German printer accused of seditious libel in 1734, including material signed by key trial participants, including New York Gov. William Cosby, should command $10,000-$12,000.

A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. signed record cover, containing an original recording of his “The American Dream” speech delivered at Syracuse University in July 1961, the precursor of King’s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech, signed “Best Wishes / Martin Luther King, Jr.”, should rise to $6,000-$7,000. Also, a wire transfer from Argentina signed and dated Dec. 13, 1952 by Oskar Schindler, in Spanish for the sum of 2600 Argentinean pesos, to be sent to Gertrude Tutsuth, has an estimate of $10,000-$12,000. Schindler famously saved 1,200 Jews during World War II.

For more information about University Archives and the online-only Rare Autographs, Photographs, Books Plus PSA Slabbed auction scheduled for January 6th, visit www.universityarchives.com.

About University Archives:
University Archives has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare items of this kind. It is actively seeking quality material for future auctions, presenting a rare opportunity for sellers. Anyone who has a single item or a collection that may be a fit for a future University Archives auction may call John Reznikoff at 203-454-0111, or email him at john@universityarchives.com. University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies. University Archives’ new offices are located at 88 Danbury Rd. (Suite 2A) in Wilton, Conn. For more information about University Archives, visit www.universityarchives.com. Updates are posted often.

Rare Rev War Powder Horn and Items Signed by JFK, Hugh Hefner, Wyatt Earp will be in University Archives Nov. 10 Auction

Wilton, CT, USA, October 27, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- A rare and historic Revolutionary War powder horn, an extensive archive of material pertaining to Playboy magazine’s Hugh Hefner, a document signed by John F. Kennedy as President and a legal summons signed by the legendary lawman Wyatt Earp will all be part of University Archives’ online auction on Wednesday, November 10th, at 10:30 am Eastern time.

The Rare Autographs, Photographs & Books auction features exceptional historical material from multiple collecting categories. “Over thirty lots of the sale illustrate the fascinating and violent history of the Old West, with many pieces from the personal collection of celebrated Western photographer Jim Tackett,” said John Reznikoff, the president of University Archives.

The catalog, with all 391 lots, is up for viewing and bidding now, on the University Archives website (www.UniversityArchives.com) as well as LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com. Phone and absentee bids will also be accepted. It’s the eighth auction that will be conducted from University Archives’ modern new 6,000-square-foot facility in Wilton, Conn.

The list of major categories is extensive, to include Early American (John Hancock, Aaron Burr, Samuel Adams, Richard Henry Lee and others); Presidents and First Ladies (John Adams to Biden, Mary Todd Lincoln to Michelle Obama, others); Old West (Emmett Dalton, Jesse and Frank James, Hanging Judge Roy Bean, others); Art (Picasso, Frank Lloyd Wright, Dr. Seuss, Oskar Fischinger) and Music (The Beatles, Kurt Cobain, George and Ira Gershwin and others).

Other categories include Entertainment, (Stan Laurel, Lenny Bruce, Hefner and others); Sports (Muhammad Ali, Mickey Mantle, Tiger Woods and others); Literature (Walt Whitman, Eugene O’Neill, E.E. Cummings and others); Civil Rights (Martin Luther King, Jr., Lucy Stone, Frederick Douglass and others); and Space / Aviation / Exploration (the Mercury and Gemini space programs, Charles Lindbergh, the Soviet cosmonauts, Fridtjof Nansen and others).

The powder horn belonging to 18-year-old minuteman Oliver Buttrick and used at the Battle of Concord on April 19, 1775 is a remarkable relic of the Revolutionary War and carries a modest pre-sale estimate of $90,000-$100,000. The Battle of Concord was the first battle of the Revolutionary War, and witnessed the “shot heard ‘round the world” that both announced and legitimized the American Revolution. It would be hard to think of a better relic symbolizing American freedom than this item. The horn has an ownership label on vellum at its base and is accompanied by over 50 pages of provenance that is available by request as a .pdf.

The large archive of original letters, cartoons, photographs and memorabilia relating to Hugh Hefner’s 75-year relationship with high school classmate and close friend Jane “Janie” Borson Sellers is expected to realize $50,000-$60,000. Included are over 150 letters by Hefner, half of which are illustrated with pen and ink cartoon drawings by him.

The one-page document signed by President John F. Kennedy on January 21, 1961, and countersigned by Secretary of State Dean Rusk, appointing “Robert S. McNamara of Michigan…Secretary of Defense”, should reach $30,000-$35,000. At the time McNamara was the youngest person ever appointed Secretary of State. He served from 1961-1968 and was largely responsible for intensifying American involvement in the Vietnam War.

The many lots documenting the lawlessness and disorderliness of the Wild West include the summons personally endorsed by a young Wyatt Earp, then just 21 years old and on his first job in law enforcement, as constable of Lamar, Missouri. In May 1870, Earp clearly wrote over twenty words on the back of a legal summons and signed it “WS Earp constable” (estimate: $30,000-$35,000).

A one-page autograph letter signed by Thomas Jefferson, in superb condition, touting America’s superiority over Europe, written to American diplomat William Lee, contains stellar content and is expected to change hands for $25,000-$30,000. Also on offer is a rare and beautiful white Chinese Export porcelain dessert bowl from Jefferson’s White House service, circa 1790s, with 13 gold stars encircling the elegant “J” monogram at the center (estimate: $10,000-$12,000).

A Civil War-dated autograph album compiled by a correspondent of Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase contains 180 signatures of Lincoln administration officials and members of the 37th U.S. Congress, including President Abraham Lincoln himself and six current and future Lincoln cabinet members (Seward, Chase, Welles, Stanton, Smith and Fessenden). It is estimated to fetch $20,000-$24,000.

An important compilation of original documents written and/or signed by members of the Hartford Convention of 1814-1815, compiled by Washington real estate developer and manuscript collector Marshall B. Coyne, including documents from all 26 delegates from five states and the Convention secretary, should earn $18,000-$20,000.

A rare letter handwritten by then-President Zachary Taylor to Secretary of the Interior Thomas Ewing, introducing Henry Waller of Louisiana, dated Nov. 27, 1849, has an estimate of $12,000-$14,000. Also, a one-page, partially printed document boldly signed by John Hancock, dated Jan. 1, 1776, appointing a Captain to the 7th Regimen of Foot (the “do not fire until you see the whites of their eyes” Regiment of Battle of Bunker Hill celebrity) should rise to $8,000-$10,000.

An autograph letter written on White House letterhead, signed “Franklin D. Roosevelt” as President, addressed to Frank Deering of Saco, Maine, a fellow Naval history collector, dated Feb. 19, 1934, is estimated to go for $10,000-$12,000. Also, an autograph letter signed by Charles Darwin written to his land agent John Higgins in 1859, just a few weeks prior to publication of his On the Origin of Species, should hit $3,000-$4,000.

A large bust portrait photograph of the renowned American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, boldly signed and inscribed on the mat, “To Max Moffett at Taliesin Aug 24/50 Frank Lloyd Wright”, is expected to finish at $5,000-$6,000; while a large, glossy black and white photograph of all four Beatles, signed, inscribed, dated and numbered by French photographer Jean-Marie Périer (b. 1940), framed, should garner $3,000-$4,000.

For more information about University Archives and the online-only Rare Autographs, Photographs & Books auction scheduled for Wednesday, November 10th, visit www.universityarchives.com.

About University Archives:
University Archives has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare items of this kind. It is actively seeking quality material for future auctions, presenting a rare opportunity for sellers. Anyone who has a single item or a collection that may be a fit for a future University Archives auction may call John Reznikoff at 203-454-0111, or email him at john@universityarchives.com. University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies. University Archives’ new offices are located at 88 Danbury Rd. (Suite 2A) in Wilton, Conn. For more information, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

Fabulous Autographs & Art, From Van Gogh to Hendrix, are in University Archives’ Online-Only Auction Wednesday, Sep 29

Wilton, CT, USA, September 14, 2021 -/ExPressRelease UK/- University Archives’ next major online-only auction, slated for Wednesday, September 29th at 10:30 am Eastern time, is titled Fabulous Autographs & Art, From Van Gogh to Hendrix. The 410-lot auction is jam-packed with historical autographs, rare books, artwork, posters, photographs, ephemera, collectibles, and relics – something for every level of collector.

“About one quarter of the sale is devoted to artists and is part of the collection of Chicagoan Noel Goldblatt, of the famous Goldblatt’s Department Store,” said John Reznikoff, the president and owner of University Archives. “Another large segment is comprised of vintage posters and photographs amassed by a Connecticut collector. We have superb material in many categories.”

The catalog is up for viewing and bidding now, on the revamped University Archives website (www.UniversityArchives.com), as well as the platforms LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com. Phone and absentee bids will also be accepted. It’s the fourth auction that will be conducted from University Archives’ new, 6,000-square-foot facilities in Wilton, Conn.

Major categories include Art (Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne others); Posters and Photographs (music, movies, TV, sports, others); Music (The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, others); Entertainment (Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, others); Early American (John Hancock, Alexander Hamilton, George A. Custer, others); and Presidential (from Washington to Obama).

Other categories include Sports (Babe Ruth, Bruce Lee, Cy Young, Jack Johnson, others); Literature (Samuel Clemens, Steinbeck, Whitman, others); World Leaders (Stalin, Russian czars, others); Space / Aviation (Apollo and Mercury programs, Wright brothers, Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart, Enola Gay, others); and Science (Einstein, Marconi, Richard Feynman, others).

U.S. Presidents will be led by a three-page letter signed by George Washington, addressed to his nephew Bushrod Washington, dated March 8, 1798, with three other Washington signatures in the body of the letter, which references Robert E. Lee’s father (estimate: $28,000-$35,000); and a military commission signed by Abraham Lincoln on February 6, 1862, promoting West Point graduate Thomas Walker to the rank of Captain, the 3rd U.S. Infantry (estimate: $7,000-$8,000).

The Early American category will feature a Mathew Brady carte de visite of George A. Custer, signed with rank as “Yours Truly / GA Custer / Bt Maj Genl / U.S.A.,” maybe the finest example University Archives has ever sold (estimate: $20,000-$26,000); and a ten-foot-tall vintage totem pole from the Pacific Northwest or Canada, intricately carved on all sides in a 360-degree-round, depicting humans and animals in a traditional primary color palette (estimate: $9,000-$10,000).

A one-page letter typed in German and signed by Albert Einstein in 1921, the year he won the Nobel Prize, regarding his theory of relativity as it pertains to the motion of Foucault’s pendulum and the rotation of the Earth, should reach $18,000-$20,000. Also, a Russian language diploma (or award) signed by Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, circa 1942, presented to a Soviet scientist who would later propose melting the polar ice caps, carries a pre-sale estimate of $8,000-$10,000.

A highlight of the Goldblatt collection is also the auction’s expected top lot: a paper fragment inscribed on both sides with about 115 full and partial words in the hand of Dutch artist Vincent Van Gogh (estimate: $40,000-$50,000). Van Gogh had copied out two verses in English of one hymn and also two stanzas in Dutch from another hymn. Van Gogh’s quest for spiritual fulfillment led him to nature, where he was most at peace and informed his artwork.

Also from the Goldblatt collection is artist Paul Cézanne’s two-page letter, signed and addressed to the subject of his famous painting, Portrait of Gustave Geffroy, mentioned funding fellow artist Auguste Rodin, whose maquette of Honoré de Balzac had just been denounced by the literary organization that commissioned it (estimate: $15,000-$20,000); and a document signed by Paul Gauguin sometime during the last three years of the artist’s life, when he was living on the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia. The receipt mentions Ambroise Vollard, Gauguin’s agent and patron, and could have represented payment for one of Gauguin’s last completed paintings of such exotic subjects as witch doctors and nude women (estimate: $15,000-$20,000).

Goldblatt’s collection also includes autographed items from Mary Cassatt, Edvard Munch, Piet Mondrian, Diego Rivera, Pablo Picasso, Gilbert Stuart, Joseph M.W. Turner, and many others.

A Wilton, Connecticut collector with a penchant for rock ’n roll and pop culture collected dozens of vintage posters and photographs, some of them autographed. The collection represents the last seven decades of popular music, from Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, and Janis Joplin to David Bowie, Aerosmith, The Rolling Stones and the Goo Goo Dolls. The items include:

  • A 1968 Jimi Hendrix Fillmore East concert poster in exceptional condition. Poster artist David Byrd’s representation of Jimi Hendrix and his bandmates in psychedelic pink and orange is one of the most iconic rock music posters of all time (estimate: $6,000-$7,000).
  • An oversized black and white photograph of The Beatles, taken in Hamburg, West Germany in 1960, signed by photographer Astrid Kirchherr, the fiancée of bass guitarist Stuart Sutcliffe, who tragically died of an aneurysm in 1962 (estimate: $2,400-$2,600).
  • An 22 inch by 28 inch photograph of Grace Slick and Janis Joplin, the two Queen Bees of San Francisco rock, taken by Jim Marshall for an article in Teen Set magazine, twice signed by Marshall and annotated, “Grace + Janis – 1967” (estimate: $2,000-$2,400).

A two-page letter written and signed by martial arts legend Bruce Lee, dated Nov. 22, 1972, to his Fists of Fury co-star Bob Baker, asking if he can send him some cocaine (“air-mail me some fine ‘C’ if you can swing it”), is expected to bring $10,000-$12,000; while a baseball signed on the sweet spot by Babe Ruth, dated 1932, inscribed “World Champs” (perhaps by the owner), and signed by three others (including Yankee pitcher Lefty Gomez), should hit $4,000-$5,000.

A rare, partial one-page document signed by Peter Stuyvesant on January 3, 1651, in Dutch, while he was serving as Director-General of the New Netherland colony (now New York City), later seized by the English in 1664, has an estimate of $4,000-$6,000. Also, a swatch of fabric from the Wright Flyer, the first airplane that made its debut flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C., on Dec. 17, 1903, 2 ¼ inches by 3 3/14 inches, encapsulated and certified, should rise to $3,000-$4,000.

University Archives’ new offices are located at 88 Danbury Rd. (Suite 2A) in Wilton, Conn. For more information about University Archives and the online-only Fabulous Autographs & Art, From Van Gogh to Hendrix auction slated for Wednesday, September 29th, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

About University Archives:
University Archives has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare items of this kind. It is actively seeking quality material for future auctions, presenting a rare opportunity for sellers. Anyone who has a single item or a collection that may be a fit for a future University Archives auction may call John Reznikoff at 203-454-0111, or email him at john@universityarchives.com. University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies. University Archives’ new offices are located at 88 Danbury Rd. (Suite 2A) in Wilton, Conn. For more information about University Archives, please visit www.universityarchives.com.